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ASSEMBLY OF FIRST NATIONS BULLETIN – April 26, 2021

on April 27, 2021

Regional Engagement Sessions First Nations National Action Plan on MMIWG

First Nations National Action Plan

The development of a National Action Plan to End Violence Against Indigenous Women in Canada is a key recommendation from the final report of the National Inquiry on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG).

The Assembly of First Nations (AFN) is developing a First Nations-led National Action Plan to End Violence Against Indigenous Women, Girls and 2SLGBTQQIA Peoples as mandated in Resolution 67/2019 passed at the AFN Annual General Assembly in Fredericton, NB.  Resolution 67/2019 directs the AFN Secretariat to work together with the AFN Women’s Council to develop a First Nations-led National Action Plan with input from the regions and First Nation survivors, families and First Nations Coalitions and Grassroots Family organizations.

Engagement Sessions

Throughout April and May 2021, AFN is hosting regional engagement sessions across the country. This series of regional engagement sessions will inform the development of a First Nations-led National Action Plan to End Violence Against Indigenous Women, Girls and 2SLGBTQQIA Peoples.

The engagement process is designed with a “families first” approach to ensure those most impacted have a key role in driving efforts to address and end violence.  The engagement sessions will welcome First Nation survivors, families and leadership to provide input and guidance in the development of the plan based on experiences in the different regions across the country.

Input from these discussion sessions in the regions will help build regional reports that will then inform the First Nations-led National Action Plan. This work will ultimately contribute to the broader National Action Plan being developed by Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada (CIRNA).

The AFN regions have been providing input and guidance in designing an engagement approach that respects the ongoing work on MMIWG2S+ of any Nation, women, or regional-led process. Each regional engagement approach has been tailored to accommodate the unique needs of that region.

Please visit www.afn.ca for more information or to be part of a regional engagement session.

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Roy WhiteduckASSEMBLY OF FIRST NATIONS BULLETIN – April 26, 2021

ASSEMBLY OF FIRST NATIONS BULLETIN – April 26, 2021

on April 26, 2021

AFN AGA & National Chief Election 2021

SUMMARY: 

  • The Assembly of First Nations (AFN) Annual General Assembly (AGA) and Election of National Chief is being hosted in Toronto and will take place virtually July 6-8, 2021.
  • The All Candidate Forum for the Election of National Chief will take place on July 6, 2021.
  • Election Day for AFN National Chief is July 7, 2021.
  • COVID-19 has impacted election procedures and as a result all voting will take place online and by telephone.
  • First Nations leadership and/or proxies will be required to register to vote online or by telephone. Voter registration information will be available in the coming weeks.
  • Voting procedures are detailed in the Charter of the Assembly of First Nations.
  • Additional information, including candidate requirements, will be made available in coming weeks.

The Assembly of First Nations (AFN) 2021 Annual General Assembly (AGA) is being hosted in Toronto, Ontario and will take place virtually July 6-8, 2021. The election of National Chief will take place during this virtual gathering, with votes cast online or by phone on July 7, 2021. The following breakdown provides information on key dates leading up to and during the election. Please note that information on voter registration will be made available in the coming weeks. Early registration will assist in carrying out the electoral process.

May 12: Electoral Officer Assumes Office & Nomination Period Opens

The Chief Electoral Officer for the 2021 election of the AFN National Chief is Ron Laufer, appointed following a motion carried at the virtual AFN AGA in December 2020. The Chief Electoral Officer is responsible for conduct of the election, receiving nominations, monitoring expenses, monitoring the All Candidate Forum and other electoral duties.

Nominations for National Chief candidates will begin May 12, 2021. Official forms for nominations will be made available through the Chief Electoral Officer.  Nominations require 15 endorsements from Chiefs from AFN member Nations. At least 8 endorsements must be from outside the candidates’ province or territory.

June 2 (11:59pm ET): Nomination Period Closes
The period for National Chief candidate nominations will close.

 June 9: Candidates List
All member nation voters will receive a list of National Chief candidates, including biographies and election procedures.

July 6: Candidates Submit Certified Preliminary Candidate Expense Statements & Contributors
All candidates will be required to submit summaries of campaign donations and expenses to the Chief Electoral Officer. Note that candidates must adhere to a $35,000 spending limit.

July 6: All Candidate Forum
Candidates for National Chief will have the opportunity to make statements and respond to questions from voters during the virtual Annual General Assembly.

July 7: Election Day
Voting for the 2021 election of AFN National Chief will take place July 7, 2021. Chiefs and proxies casting votes online and by telephone will do so through the Simply Voting online system. This system has been internationally tested for accuracy and efficiency. Online voting is subject to audit to ensure accuracy of results. All voting procedures are detailed in full in the Charter of the Assembly of First Nations.

Additional information, including candidate requirements, will be made available in coming weeks.

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Roy WhiteduckASSEMBLY OF FIRST NATIONS BULLETIN – April 26, 2021

AFN National Chief to Address UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues re. Bill C-15

on April 22, 2021

Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde will address the international community virtually at the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues tomorrow on the topic of implementing the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UN Declaration) in Canada.

DATE:
Friday April 23, 2021

TIME:
9:00 – 11:00 a.m. ET

LINK:
UN WebTV

National Chief Bellegarde will speak during a session identified for follow up to the 2014 World Conference on Indigenous Peoples where states unanimously agreed to the importance of national implementation of the global, minimum standards set out in the UN Declaration. National Chief Bellegarde’s comments and written submission will focus on the implementation of the UN Declaration in Canada, its significance as a foundational international standard and the need for parliamentary support for Bill C-15 and Royal Assent before this current session of Parliament ends.

Bill C-15 is a proposed federal law setting out a process to implement the UN Declaration in Canada. The Bill was introduced in the House of Commons on December 3, 2020 and passed second reading in the House of Commons April 19, 2021.

 

The Assembly of First Nations is the national organization representing First Nations people in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter at @AFN_Updates.

 

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For more information please contact:

Kelly Reid
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-292-0857
[email protected]

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Roy WhiteduckAFN National Chief to Address UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues re. Bill C-15

ASSEMBLY OF FIRST NATIONS BULLETIN – April 22, 2021

on April 22, 2021

AFN National Climate Strategy & Survey

 

AFN National Climate Gathering and Strategy

For decades, First Nations Elders and Knowledge Keepers have been telling us that Mother Earth is in a crisis. First Nations are often the first to see the impacts of climate change on the lands, waters and animals.  Our deep connection and reciprocal relationship with the land has allowed us to take an important leadership role to address the climate crisis. Mandated by Chiefs-in-Assembly, the AFN is developing a First Nations-led climate strategy.  The AFN National Climate Strategy will be informed by First Nations leaders, Elders, Knowledge Keepers, women, youth, and experts in all areas of climate action.

At the AFN Annual General Assembly in July 2019, Chiefs-in-Assembly declared a First Nations Climate Emergency, recognizing that “climate change constitutes a state of emergency for our lands, waters, animals, and peoples” and passed AFN resolution 05/2019 Declaration of a First Nations Climate Emergency.  The resolution directs the AFN to work in coordination with First Nations, AFN regions and the Advisory Committee on Climate Action and the Environment (ACE) to plan a national gathering and develop a strategy.

Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, AFN hosted its first ever National Climate Gathering. On March 3 and 4, 2020, more than 400 First Nations from across Canada gathered on the traditional territory of the Ta’an Kwächän and the Kwanlin Dün to discuss the urgency of the climate crisis, and explore First Nations-perspectives on climate impacts, risks, and opportunities at a local, regional, national, and international level.

To learn more about findings from the first ever AFN National Climate Gathering please visit the AFN web site for report and videos from the event.

AFN National Climate Change Strategy Survey

In honour of Mother Earth Day on April 22, 2021, AFN launched the AFN National Climate Strategy Survey which aims to gather knowledge and best practices from First Nations that will inform the development of an AFN National Climate Strategy. Information collected from this survey will help identify key themes of action, priorities and expectations required for policymaking. This work at the national level will complement multiple regional efforts, that are taking place in British Columbia, Yukon Region, and the Atlantic Region, and offer a unique national perspective.

AFN recognizes the highest standards of research practice and will ensure the principles of OCAP (Ownership, Control, Access, and Possession) will be respected. Responses will remain confidential, and we do not collect identifying information such as name, email address or IP address.

For more information and to participate in the AFN National Climate Survey please visit: https://forms.office.com/r/y5AWPVAeV6

For more information, please contact Graeme Reed Senior Advisor, Environment, Lands and Water Branch at [email protected]

 

 

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Roy WhiteduckASSEMBLY OF FIRST NATIONS BULLETIN – April 22, 2021

ASSEMBLY OF FIRST NATIONS BULLETIN – April 20, 2021

on April 21, 2021

Federal Budget 2021

SUMMARY: 

  • The federal budget was tabled in the House of Commons on April 19, 2021
  • Budget 2021 commits a total of $18 billion for Indigenous peoples – the largest ever investment for First Nations
  • Cumulative budget investments since 2015 have surpassed $39 billion

The AFN will continue to advocate for consistent and sustained investments to close the socio-economic gap only widening as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic

The 2021 federal budget tabled Monday April 19, 2021 by Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland includes the largest ever investment for First Nations and builds on the momentum achieved through First Nations advocacy.  Cumulative budget investments toward Indigenous priorities since 2015 have surpassed $39 billion.

Budget 2021 includes a total of $18 billion over five years for Indigenous people, with much of the funding committed to addressing the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.  It specifically responds to areas identified by First Nations for additional support to respond to COVID-19, such as mental wellness, health response, and safety measures for educational spaces, items reflected in the throne speeches of 2019 and 2020.

Additional investments have been identified for health, infrastructure and essential services, economic development, child and family services, policing and justice, education, languages, culture, and economic development, detailed below and in the attached chart.

COVID-19 Supports:

Budget 2021 commits that Indigenous communities will have the resources they need to deliver vaccine doses to people as quickly as possible. The commitment totals $478.1 million in health response and $760.8 million for the Indigenous Community Support Fund.

Mental wellness:

Budget 2021 promises innovative mental health interventions for populations disproportionately impacted by COVID 19, including First Nations. Indigenous peoples will receive $36 million over three years to address the mental health impacts of COVID-19.

Addressing Racism in Health:

Budget 2021 makes specific reference to the death of Joyce Echaquan and the devastating consequences of anti-Indigenous racism in Canada’s health care systems. It identifies $127.7 million over three years for efforts toward equitable access to healthcare without discrimination, and $12.5 million over five years, and $2.5 ongoing to support the well-being of families and survivors through project-based programming in collaboration with the National Family Survivors Circle.

Infrastructure and Essential Services:

This federal budget commits $4.3 billion over four years for an Indigenous Community Infrastructure Fund and $1.7 billion over five years ($338.9 million ongoing) for Operations and Maintenance on-reserve.

Economic development and Growth:

This federal budget includes 11 programs that will provide funding for Indigenous economic development. Programs include modernizing federal procurement and creating opportunities for specific communities by diversifying the federal supplier base ($87.4 million) and designating $117 million for the Indigenous Community Business Fund. Following up on a commitment made in 2019, the budget promises $150 million for the launch of the Indigenous Growth Fund. This fund will provide capital to Indigenous entrepreneurs to aid in securing additional investors. This new fund is the result of collaboration between the National Aboriginal Capital Corporation Association and the Business Development Bank of Canada.

Child and Family Services:

This budget references the federal government’s commitment to working with Indigenous leadership to reform child and family services in ways that Indigenous children have every opportunity to grow up in their communities, immersed in their cultures and with their families and relatives.  It commits $1 billion over five years and $118 million ongoing for child and family services, and $73.6 million over four years for the implementation of Bill C-92 (an Act Respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth and families).

Policing:

Budget 2021 proposes to provide $43.7 million over five years to establish First Nations policing as an essential service and an investment of $540.3 million over five years to expand the First Nations Policing Program and $108.6 million over five years to repair, renovate, and replace policing facilities in First Nation and Inuit communities.  These and additional investment in this area total 886.1 million over five years.

Justice:

This federal budget identifies $74.8 over three years to improve access to justice for Indigenous people and support the development of an Indigenous justice strategy to address systemic discrimination and the overrepresentation of Indigenous people in the justice system.

MMIWG:

The government will provide $2.2 billion over five years to implement the Calls for Justice of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. Budget 2021 will begin these investments in 2021-22, with $160.9 million ongoing.

Education:

Budget 2021 promises $1.2 billion over five years for three areas related to Indigenous education. COVID-19 support, including PPE for students and staff as well as remote learning resources, will receive $112 million in 2021-22. Student transportation and Regional Education Agreements will receive $726 million over five years, starting in 2021-22. First Nations adults on reserve who wish to complete their high school degree have $350 million in funding support.

Culture and Language:

Budget 2021 designates $460 million for Indigenous culture and language-based programs. $275 million will bolster reclamation, revitalization, and strengthening of Indigenous languages. The budget also promises investments of $14.9 million for the preservation of Indigenous heritage through Library and Archives Canada. Additional funds will support cultural spaces, sports and recreational activities, and programs specific to Indigenous women and girls.

The AFN will continue to advocate for consistent and sustained investments to close the socio-economic gap only widening as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. For further details on all programs included in the $18 billion investment for Indigenous peoples, please see the attached chart.

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Roy WhiteduckASSEMBLY OF FIRST NATIONS BULLETIN – April 20, 2021

NATIONAL CHIEF WELCOMES FEDERAL INVESTMENTS IN BUDGET 2021

on April 19, 2021

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde says the 2021 federal budget tabled today in Ottawa includes the largest investment ever for First Nations and builds on the momentum achieved through unprecedented investments since 2015.

“In an exceptionally challenging and unpredictable time as the entire country faces the impacts of COVID-19, Budget 2021 puts forward more than $18 billion for Indigenous peoples – a result of sustained advocacy by First Nations to close the socioeconomic gap between First Nations people and the rest of Canada,” said AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde today from Ottawa. “The realities of First Nations have been exacerbated during the COVID-19 pandemic. These investments will help First Nations respond and recover from the pandemic and will help support plans to end violence against Indigenous women and girls, better support First Nations policing, revitalize our languages, and implement legislation related to child and family services.

The federal budget released today by Minister of Finance Chrystia Freeland touches on many First Nations priorities, including  $6 billion for infrastructure and essential services for Indigenous communities, $1.2 billion for Indigenous education, $1 billion for child and family services, $861 million to improve policing in Indigenous communities, $460 million for culture and language-based programs, $150 million for an Indigenous economic growth fund and $74 million for a new Indigenous justice strategy, among other investments.

“We’ve made significant progress over the last six years toward closing the socioeconomic gap, but progress is not parity,” said National Chief Bellegarde.  “We will not close the gap unless we see sustained investments in proper health care, education and training, water, infrastructure, and housing – basic necessities that too many of our people do not have access to and as a result, continue to hold back First Nations and all of Canada.  When First Nations are successful, Canada is too.”

The AFN is conducting a full analysis on investments to be made available in coming days.

 

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations people in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

 

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For more information please contact:
Kelly Reid
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-292-0857 (cell)
[email protected]

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Roy WhiteduckNATIONAL CHIEF WELCOMES FEDERAL INVESTMENTS IN BUDGET 2021

Assembly Of First Nations Welcomes Supreme Court Ruling On Carbon Pricing Legislation

on March 26, 2021

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde welcomes yesterday’s Supreme Court of Canada decision on the Greenhouse Gas Pollution Pricing Act, urging all levels of government to respect First Nations rights, title, and jurisdiction and responsibilities to traditional territories in its implementation.

“Environmentalists and economists agree that putting a price on pollution is the most effective way to address climate change, and I welcome this decision as a way to help curb the impacts of climate change in our territories and across the country,” said AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde. “The recognition by the Supreme Court’s in its decision that climate change causes significant harm in the Canadian Arctic, on coastal communities and on Indigenous peoples is important. First Nations are often the first to feel the harmful effects of climate change. I reiterate the need for provincial and territorial governments to work together with First Nations as leaders in climate action to identify meaningful and effective solutions to address the impacts of climate change on our communities, infrastructure, ways of life and well-being.”

The Supreme Court of Canada ruled March 25 that the Greenhouse Gas Pollution Pricing Act (GGPPA) is constitutional.  The decision comes after Ontario, Saskatchewan and Alberta challenged the GGPPA legislation since it was first implemented in 2019 (ON and SK) and 2020 (AB). The provinces argued that the Act’s two-tiered carbon pricing was unconstitutional and undermined provincial authority over natural resources.

The AFN, based on direction from the Chiefs-in-Assembly, intervened in this case, as well as court cases in Saskatchewan, Ontario and Alberta, arguing the Government of Canada has a direct legal obligation to recognize Aboriginal and Treaty rights in any legislative efforts to address climate change.

“The impact of Climate Change is felt everywhere, especially in the north,” said AFN Yukon Regional Chief Kluane Adamek, Chair of the AFN Advisory Committee on Climate Action and the Environment.   “First Nations require immediate actions and rights based approaches.  While we embrace these efforts to mitigate the damage of greenhouse gas emissions, we stand firm that First Nations rights, title, and jurisdiction over their traditional territories is paramount when considering carbon pricing, and by extension climate solutions. First Nations have been leaders in proposing transformative strategies for environmental protection. We must ensure that following this Supreme Court ruling, implementation and enforcement of the GGPPA will respect First Nations jurisdiction, title and rights as stewards of the land.”

AFN Chiefs-in-Assembly, through Resolution 103/2017: Carbon Pricing Regimes mandates AFN to develop innovative solutions to the unique circumstances of First Nations, including the possibility of revenue recycling mechanisms that minimize the disproportionate effects of carbon pricing on First Nations. In Resolution 09/2018: Develop First Nations-Specific Solutions for the Green House Gas Pollution Pricing Act, Chiefs – in – Assembly reaffirmed these calls, in addition to the need for financial support for First Nations to explore the implications and opportunities of carbon pricing on their territories, including their participation in the clean energy economy.

 

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nation peoples in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter at @AFN_Updates.

 

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For more information please contact:
Kelly Reid
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
905-717-0062 (cell)
[email protected]

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Roy WhiteduckAssembly Of First Nations Welcomes Supreme Court Ruling On Carbon Pricing Legislation

Assembly of First Nations calls for sustained investments for water certainty

on February 26, 2021

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde says urgent action is required to end long-term boil water advisories and achieve water certainty in First Nations following yesterday’s release of a report by the Office of the Auditor General of Canada evaluating water-related commitments made by the federal government.

“Access to safe, clean water is more important now than ever to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 and keep us all safe,” said AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde.  “While there has been some progress to address and end boil water advisories, currently more than 50 remain, and one is too many. I continue to urge the federal government to work together with First Nations to implement long-term solutions that will provide water certainty for our children and families.  I want to see significant and sustained investments in water treatment and water distribution for First Nations, a renewed commitment by the federal government to end boil water advisories within realistic timelines and real investments in First Nations infrastructure to close the infrastructure gap by 2030.”

The report Access to Safe Drinking Water in First Nations released today by the Office of the Auditor General of Canada highlights three main areas of concern:  the commitment by Indigenous Services Canada to eliminate long-term drinking water advisories, the operations and maintenance policy for water and wastewater and the now 30-year-old funding formula, and potential for a regulatory framework.

Indigenous Services Canada Minister Marc Miller announced recently the government will not meet their target to end long-term boil water advisories by March 2021. To date at least 57 long-term advisories are in place across Canada.

“Water is sacred to First Nations and key to the health and well-being of all living things,” said National Chief Bellegarde. “We must see the human right to safe drinking water prioritized by our government partners. Sustained funding, including investments in operations and maintenance that reflect the true costs, not formula-driven numbers, is the only way to address long-standing issues and ensure safe drinking water for our people and nations.”

In the 2019 Speech from the Throne, the federal government committed to “continue the work of eliminating all long-term drinking water advisories on reserve by 2021 and ensure safe drinking water in First Nations.” The repeal and replacement of the Safe Drinking Water for First Nations Act, together with co-developed legislation, continues to be a priority for First Nations as a necessary step to ensuring the future of safe drinking water in First Nations across the country.

AFN is hosting virtual engagement sessions with First Nations leaders and water experts on the repeal and replacement of the Safe Drinking Water for First Nations Act this week.

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nation peoples in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter at @AFN_Updates.

For more information please contact:
Karen Joyner
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-292-0857 (cell)
[email protected]

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Celso CercadoAssembly of First Nations calls for sustained investments for water certainty

Assembly of First Nations Knowledge Keepers demand serious action to ensure clean drinking water for All First Nations

on February 17, 2021

(Ottawa, ON) – On the first day of a national virtual gathering focused on protecting water in uncertain times hosted by the Assembly of First Nations (AFN), a committee of Knowledge Keepers representing First Nations from coast to coast to coast delivered the following statement:

“Water is life. Access to safe drinking water is a basic human right.

It flows through all of us. Through plants and animals. It is our lifeblood, essential to our sustenance and survival.

Why then is water inaccessible for so many First Nations? There are currently at minimum 57 long-term drinking water advisories in 39 First Nations across Canada, some of which have been active for more than 20 years. How can Government of Canada continue to neglect our peoples and nations, our children and families? Situations like those in Neskatanga First Nation, Shoal Lake No.40 First Nation, and Eabametoong First Nation would be unacceptable in an urban center in Canada. Is there a reason, then, that decades’ long advisories are a reality for First Nations?

As Bedahbun Moonias from Neskatanga First Nation said, ‘Sometimes I feel like we don’t exist…we’re just ghosts put away in a drawer.’

Just as our ancestors and grandmothers have performed water ceremonies since time immemorial, First Nations have understood that water is sacred and must be protected, appreciated, and honoured. Water is what connects all facets of our lives as First Nations peoples. It is in our traditional ways of hunting and fishing. It is in our ceremonies and in our songs. Without clean water, the fabric of our culture will surely collapse. The poison that infects our water chains us to failure, to declining health, and to lives that will always be tied to danger.

First Nations peoples have the right to clean drinking water as stated in the United Nations Resolution 64/292, Human Right to Water and Sanitation. The Resolution, “[recognizes] the right to safe and clean drinking water and sanitation as a human right that is essential for the full enjoyment of life and all human rights.” At the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) Annual General Assembly in July 2019, the Chiefs-in-Assembly, through AFN Resolution 53/2019 Human Right to Clean Drinking Water, called on the federal government to “immediately remove bureaucratic barriers and systemic failures in guidelines and policies which lead to the denial of the basic human right to clean drinking water to the residents of Attawapiskat First Nation, and all other First Nation communities who are experiencing similar problems,” and yet there are still First Nations being denied access to this right. Canada has failed and continues to fail First Nations in these regards.

We will continue to stand up for our human rights, our treaty rights, and for the protection of Mother Earth’s water. It is our sincere hope that we will not have to fight much longer. Already, the Government of Canada acknowledged that it will not meet its own original deadline of March 2021 to ensure that all First Nations’ drinking water is safe. It is no wonder then that so many First Nations have lost faith in the government’s ability to live up to their word.

Time and time again, First Nations have been united in our hardships. We have had to speak with a united voice in order to be heard and understood by Canada. So again, we ask that First Nations peoples be offered the same treatment as all Canadians. Is there a deeper and more dangerous reason as to why we have been forced to live without this basic right for so long? Is this failure racially based? How can this inaction be allowed to happen?

It is paramount that Canada commits to ending the water crisis faced by First Nations across the country. If this continues to be pushed aside, if First Nations are continually told that their lives hold no value, then we will know for certain that Canada sees us only as ghosts.”

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter at @AFN_Updates.

For more information please contact:
Karen Joyner
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-292-0857 (cell)
[email protected]

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Celso CercadoAssembly of First Nations Knowledge Keepers demand serious action to ensure clean drinking water for All First Nations