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AFN STATEMENT – October 11, 2019

on October 11, 2019

AFN Statement on Regional Chief Removal by Regional Leadership

The Assembly of First Nations (AFN) Executive recognizes and respects the removal of Morley Googoo as Regional Chief for Nova Scotia-Newfoundland by First Nations leadership in the region, consistent with article 17 of the AFN Charter. Under AFN By-Laws, Mr. Googoo is no longer a Board member of the AFN and the region must appoint or elect a new member. In the interim, the AFN will work with the regional leadership to ensure the interests of their region are heard and addressed.

On September 25, 2019, the AFN Executive adopted a Code of Conduct as part of their commitment to lead by example and ensure a safe environment, free of violence, discrimination and harassment. The AFN has zero tolerance for harassment and violence of any kind.

The Code of Conduct is in effect, and a formal signing is being planned for the upcoming AFN Special Chiefs Assembly in Ottawa, Ontario on December 3-5, to be witnessed by all First Nations Chiefs and delegates at the Assembly.

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Roy WhiteduckAFN STATEMENT – October 11, 2019

AFN Says Substantial Investments for Mental Wellness in First Nations are Essential in Closing the Health Gap Between First Nations and Canada

on October 10, 2019

(Ottawa, ON) – On World Mental Health Day, the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) urges all federal leaders commit to substantial investments for mental wellness for First Nations as a top priority and to work diligently with First Nations and ensure First Nations enjoy the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health.

“We must work together to improve the health and wellbeing of all First Nations and ensure we close the gap by developing health services that are driven by First Nations, that respect our rights and incorporate traditional health and healing practices” said AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde.  “I believe our culture, languages and traditions have an integral role in achieving overall health and wellness.  One of the priorities we are seeking during this federal election is a commitment from all parties to substantive, long term and flexible funding that supports a holistic approach to First Nations health and wellbeing. We are the youngest, fastest growing population. Healthy First Nations will make a stronger country for all of us.”

On September 9, 2019, the AFN unveiled its agenda for the next government, Honouring Promises: 2019 Federal Elections Priorities for First Nations and Canada which sets out a comprehensive agenda for reconciliation and closing the gap. The AFN continues to work directly with First Nations to advocate for appropriate supports and investments for First Nations-led approaches, with the intent of creating initiatives, policies, funding mechanisms, programs and services that are culturally relevant and provide proven results to all First Nations across Canada.

“It is incredibly important for me to highlight World Mental Health Day, because mental wellness continues to be a priority that is overlooked, and requires all our attention, support and energy,” said AFN Yukon Regional Chief Kluane Adamek, who holds the Mental Wellness portfolio for AFN.  “The theme this year focuses on suicide prevention, which connects with so many of us and our communities. We are losing our community members, and especially our young people at an alarming rate. Everyone has a role to play in supporting mental wellness and our young people need to know their lives matter. We continue to advocate for increased investments in mental health services and suicide prevention programs, and we also need to address the fundamental determinants of health such as access to clean water, education and proper housing. We must learn from our past and present realities and ensure mental wellness remains a top focus to ensure stronger and healthier futures for our children.”

World Mental Health Day is presented by the World Federation of Mental Health and recognized annually on October 10.

Read Honouring Promises: 2019 Federal Elections Priorities for First Nations and Canada here: https://www.afn.ca/2019-federal-election/

 The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada.  Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

For more information, please contact:

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 382
613-292-0857 (mobile)
[email protected]

Michael Hutchinson
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 244
613-859-6831 (cell)
[email protected]

 

 

 

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Angie TurnerAFN Says Substantial Investments for Mental Wellness in First Nations are Essential in Closing the Health Gap Between First Nations and Canada

AFN National Chief Bellegarde Extremely Disappointed in Canada’s Request for Judicial Review of CHRT Ruling to Compensate Children

on October 4, 2019

(Ottawa, ON): Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde is extremely disappointed to hear of today’s request for judicial review by the Government of Canada on the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal (CHRT) decision that secured compensation for First Nations children wrongly removed or denied essential services.

“This is beyond unacceptable. The Government of Canada is once again preparing to fight First Nations children in court. I’ve connected with Minister Seamus O’Regan to share my deep disappointment,” said AFN National Chief Bellegarde. “The AFN will always stand up and fight for First Nations children and families. The CHRT panel found that the government racially discriminated against First Nations children in care in a willful and reckless manner. As a result, the CHRT ordered Canada to pay the maximum amount allowable under the Canadian Human Rights Act. The government could have addressed the broken system and the funding inequalities before, but they didn’t. To appeal this CHRT ruling, which was meant to provide a measure of justice for First Nations children in care, is hurtful and unjust.”

It is estimated that a minimum of 54,000 children and their families could have benefitted from this ruling. The CHRT has issued seven compliance orders against Canada since its original ruling in January 2016.

“It is time for Canada to stop obstructing fairness and justice, end its discriminatory practices, and start taking responsibility for its historic and ongoing treatment of First Nations children. First Nations children must be provided the care and opportunity they deserve,” said AFN Manitoba Regional Chief Kevin Hart, who holds the child welfare portfolio for the AFN.

 

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada.  Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

 

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For more information please contact:

Michael Hutchinson
Senior Communication Advisor
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 244
613-859-6831 (cell)
[email protected]

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 382
613-292-0857 (mobile)
[email protected]

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Roy WhiteduckAFN National Chief Bellegarde Extremely Disappointed in Canada’s Request for Judicial Review of CHRT Ruling to Compensate Children

AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde Demands Action on Recommendations of the Viens Report, the Latest of Many Reports Concluding Systemic Discrimination a Reality for First Nations

on October 1, 2019

(Ottawa, ON):  Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde insists the Government of Quebec – and all governments – take action to eliminate the kinds of systemic discrimination described in the Viens Report.

“This is the latest in a long series of reports that show over and over the systemic discrimination facing First Nations men and women that does real harm to their health and safety.  The report calls for an apology, but that is only meaningful if it is followed by action.” said AFN National Chief Bellegarde.  “The Government of Quebec and all agencies need to work with First Nations to act on these recommendations. Justice and policing are important to ensure people feel safe and secure, but this is just part of the overall reform that’s needed. I lift up all First Nations citizens and the regional leadership who provided valuable input to the Inquiry. We honour the women who came forward, whose experiences led to the creation of this Commission. They deserve justice and their experience must be addressed in the follow-up action. We have roadmaps to real change in reports by the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and many more studies before that. Now it’s time to implement the recommendations.  It’s time to take action.”

The 142 recommendations issued within the report call for sweeping changes in the fields of policing, justice, social services, and mental-health services. In some regions of the province, policing and justice infrastructure on-reserve has been found to be woefully inadequate or non-existent. The report indicates that greater logistic and funding support is urgently needed for First Nations policing and justice systems.

The Viens Inquiry began in December 2016 after allegations of sexual misconduct and violence by Quebec Police were brought forward by First Nations women in the Val d’Or region of Quebec.  The AFN is still waiting for an explanation from the Crown prosecutor’s office on the lack of charges against the six Québec provincial police officers in Val-d’Or accused of physical and sexual abuse against Indigenous women.

 

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada.  Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

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For more information, please contact:

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 382
613-292-0857 (mobile)
[email protected]

Michael Hutchinson
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 201
613-859-6831 (cell)
[email protected] 

read more
Roy WhiteduckAFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde Demands Action on Recommendations of the Viens Report, the Latest of Many Reports Concluding Systemic Discrimination a Reality for First Nations

National Chief Bellegarde and Regional Chiefs march with Climate Warrior Greta Thunberg in Montreal to bring Attention to the Climate Crisis

on September 27, 2019

(Montreal, QC) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Bellegarde, AFN Yukon Regional Chief Adamek, and AFN Regional Chief for Quebec and Labrador, Ghislain Picard, will march today with the AFNQL First Nation Youth Network, climate warrior Greta Thunberg, and hundreds of thousands of young people concerned about the future of the planet. The National Chief demanded Canada and countries across the globe listen to the youth and take immediate action to address the number one crisis facing this generation. The AFN’s National Youth Council hosted a national environmental Youth Summit in April 2019. The Youth Council, with more than 75 other young emerging leaders, gathered together to make recommendations on climate action.

“We must ensure that our lands, waters, non-human beings, medicines and sacred sites are protected and accessible now and for the seven generations to come,” said female Co-Chair of the AFN Youth Council, Rosalie Labillois. “Canada’s governments must support all youth in developing options for implementing a net-zero carbon emission future including green-infrastructure, technology and innovative solutions in First Nations and across the country.

Rollin Baldhead, male Co-Chair of the AFN Youth Council, said we urgently need to implement fundamental changes in the way we go about our daily lives. “It is time for our current generation of leaders and politicians to take real and substantial action to stop the climate crisis. If you care about your children’s future, how can you not take action now? We only have one planet. Everything we depend on for life is here. If we destroy Mother Earth, we destroy ourselves. We need everyone on board together to heal our planet. Governments must support youth in developing education and training for local and land-based solutions,” said Baldhead.

National Chief Bellegarde insists that all federal party leaders commit to working with First Nations on a national plan to address the climate crisis with specific actions and measurable targets.

“The climate crisis – the climate emergency – is our number one priority. Everything hinges on a livable world and a healthy environment for our children. We must act now to mitigate the negative impacts of climate change and ensure a healthy and positive future for young people, like Greta Thunberg and the AFN Youth Council,” said National Chief Bellegarde. “First Nations believe we are only borrowing Mother Earth from future generations. It would be unforgivable for our generation to leave the world in a state of extreme uncertainty for those who will inherit it from us. This is an emergency and First Nations, with the incorporation of our traditional knowledge, are the leaders in providing solutions. I was proud to be part of honouring, an amazing Anishinabek youth, Autumn Peltier at our AGA in Fredericton and hearing her powerful message about protecting the water. Every leader of every political party in Canada needs to commit to working with First Nations on a national action plan with specific targets and progress that can be measured and assessed. We need drastic action to avoid global catastrophe.”

National Chief Bellegarde said that First Nations are often the first to feel the disproportionate impacts of climate change and must deal with the serious and devastating effects including forest fires, flooding and food insecurity.

AFN Yukon Regional Chief Kluane Adamek said that the Chiefs in the Yukon, a region among the most significantly impacted by climate change, recently passed a resolution that calls on leadership and Canada to recognize the accelerated impacts of the climate emergency in the north and the need to take immediate action.

“Humanity and our planet cannot wait any longer. Our future cannot be directed by partisanship or politics. We all need to act. The transition to a just future rests in our hands and we are running out of time. First Nations have the solutions and are already implementing them in many communities throughout the country. We need to lift up the work of those advocating for climate action and stand together in this global movement. We are ready to work with all governments in Canada and beyond,” Regional Chief Adamek said. “Meeting our targets under the Paris Agreement requires a focused and sustained effort but those targets must not be seen as optional or aspirational goals. The Paris Agreement sets out a positive and progressive plan of action. It is the first climate change agreement that commits countries to ambitious climate action, while respecting the rights of Indigenous peoples. The future depends on us. Canada and countries across the globe must act now to stop our world from drastically changing for the worse.”

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada.  Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

 

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For more information, please contact:

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 382
613-292-0857 (mobile)
[email protected]

Michael Hutchinson
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 201
613-859-6831 (cell)
[email protected] 

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Roy WhiteduckNational Chief Bellegarde and Regional Chiefs march with Climate Warrior Greta Thunberg in Montreal to bring Attention to the Climate Crisis

National Chief Perry Bellegarde Fully Supports the Listuguj First Nation in Exercising their Treaty Right to Fish in their Territory

on September 26, 2019

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde says he supports the Listuguj First Nation as they assert their rights and conduct a commercial lobster fishery, this fall, despite Department of Fisheries and Oceans’ (DFO) refusal to issue a commercial license. Listuguj, a Mi’gmaq First Nation in Quebec, has been trying to work with the DFO to exercise their rights to a moderate livelihood fishery – a right recognized by the Supreme Court of Canada within the Marshall Decision of 1999.

“The Supreme Court of Canada, in the Marshall Decision, made it clear, Canada and all its agencies must recognize the Treaty rights of the Listuguj First Nation to fish and to exercise a moderate livelihood through fishing,” said AFN National Chief Bellegarde. “Fishing is a part of the Mi’gmaq people’s culture, identity and economy, and has been for generations. The Listuguj First Nation has been pursuing a peaceful and cooperative way forward. Any path must recognize and respect their Treaty rights, inherent rights and the decision of Canada’s own Supreme Court. I support their right to harvest and make a living off of lobster, and I stand with the citizens and leaders of the Listuguj First Nation.”

In 1999, the Supreme Court of Canada affirmed in the Marshall Decision that the Mi’kmaq have a Treaty right to hunt, fish, harvest and gather in their territory for the purposes of trade, and to earn a moderate livelihood. The Supreme Court of Canada confirmed that the Peace and Friendship Treaties of 1760-61 and the Canadian constitution protect the right of Mi’gmaq communities to fish commercially to provide for themselves. The DFO has the authority to impose limits on Mi’gmaq commercial fishing, but only if these limits are minimally intrusive, follow meaningful consultation, and are aimed at achieving a compelling objective, such as conservation or safety. The DFO has offered no explanation that could justify its refusal to issue a commercial fishing license this fall.

Last November, Canada and the Listuguj Mi’gmaq Government signed a Framework Agreement on Reconciliation and the Fisheries. That agreement kicked off formal negotiations on fisheries governance and fishing rights. Those negotiations are ongoing.

“The people of Listuguj rely on fishing to support themselves and their families. It does not make sense that this First Nation would not be given a commercial license,” said AFN Quebec Regional Chief Ghislain Picard. “The community cannot be made to wait for permission to exercise a right they already have. This issue must be resolved to ensure the livelihood and prosperity of the people of Listuguj. They are asking for nothing more than for Canada to honour their rights and the decisions of its own courts.”

The Listuguj First Nation has held a fall lobster fishery for the past two decades for the purposes of feeding its citizens, and has no intention of increasing fishing beyond what is sustainable. However, this year some of the lobster caught in the fall will be sold to offset costs. Since the Marshall decision, Listuguj has also conducted a limited commercial lobster fishery each spring. For the spring fishery, the DFO issues the Listuguj Mi’gmaq Government a commercial licence. The Listuguj leadership remains committed to negotiating a long-term arrangement with Canada, but they cannot be made to wait indefinitely.

During its recent Annual General Assembly, the AFN passed Resolution # 65-2019 “Recognition of the Marshall Decision”, which recognizes and affirms the 20th Anniversary of the Marshall Decision by the Supreme Court of Canada. It also affirmed the Nation-to-Nation relationship of the Mi’kmaq, Wolastoqey and Peskotomuhkati with the Crown on the unceded traditional territorial lands and waters of these First Nations. It directed the AFN to continue advocacy with the federal government to uphold and honour all Treaty relationships with First Nations in Canada.

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada.  Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

For more information, please contact:

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 382
613-292-0857 (mobile)
[email protected]

Michael Hutchinson
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 201
613-859-6831 (cell)
[email protected]

 

 

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Sid LeeNational Chief Perry Bellegarde Fully Supports the Listuguj First Nation in Exercising their Treaty Right to Fish in their Territory

“We Must Bring Justice and Healing to the Families Whose Children Never Made it Home from Residential Schools,” Says AFN NWT Regional Chief Yakeleya

on September 19, 2019

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) NWT Regional Chief Norman Yakeleya attended a presentation by the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation (NCTR) yesterday on their work regarding Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) Call to Action 72, which calls on the federal government to allocate sufficient resources to the NCTR to allow it to “develop and maintain the National Residential School Student Death Register” established by the TRC that compiles information about children who died while under the responsibility of Indian Residential School authorities. The NCTR has advised that it will be making this register available to the public in the near future.

“We must bring justice and healing to the families whose children never made it home from the residential schools,” said AFN NWT Regional Chief Yakeleya, who oversees this work for the AFN. “We have taken steps to work towards healing and justice for the living survivors with the Residential Schools Settlement Agreement and the Indian Day School Class Action Settlement.  Now we must take care of those who have passed or gone missing.  We know this is sensitive and significant work. We must ensure the families affected by this tragedy receive justice and healing.  We must address this dark chapter in our shared history.  Truth and justice are essential to reconciliation and I commend the NCTR’s efforts to develop and maintain this registry.  Today, my thoughts are with the memory and spirits of those who did not make it home.”

In 2015, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Missing Children and Unmarked Burials Working Group investigated the history of Indigenous children who died at Residential Schools. To date, the most accurate number available of deceased children is 4,200 as identified by the NCTR through named and unnamed death records. Calls to Action 72-76 emphasize the need to commemorate, document and protect burial sites and for the NCTR to develop and maintain a National Student Death Register established by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada.

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada.  Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

For more information, please contact:

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 382
613-292-0857 (mobile)
[email protected]

Michael Hutchinson
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 201
613-859-6831 (cell)
[email protected]

 

 

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Angie Turner“We Must Bring Justice and Healing to the Families Whose Children Never Made it Home from Residential Schools,” Says AFN NWT Regional Chief Yakeleya

Update on New Fiscal Relationship – National Chief Perry Bellegarde Bulletin

on September 19, 2019

September 2019

SUMMARY: 

  • The Joint Advisory Committee on Fiscal Relations (JACFR) presented their interim report, Honouring Our Ancestors by Trailblazing a Path to the Future, to the National Chief and Minister of Indigenous Services Canada in June 2019.
  • Consistent with the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) resolution 24/2019, the JACFR, the AFN and ISC will engage extensively with First Nations on the report over the coming months and report back on their findings to Chiefs-in-Assembly at the AFN Annual General Assembly in July 2020.

pdf version

On June 10, 2019, the Joint Advisory Committee on Fiscal Relations (JACFR) presented their interim report, Honouring Our Ancestors by Trailblazing a Path to the Future, to Minister O’Regan of Indigenous Services Canada (ISC) and myself. A copy of that report is available on the Assembly of First Nations website at www.afn.ca/policy-sectors/fiscal-relations/

Both Minister O’Regan and I were impressed with the thorough and bold vision put forward by the Committee and we agreed that First Nations and the Government of Canada should give the report thorough consideration. Resolution 24/2019, Engage Extensively with First Nations on the Report of the Joint Advisory Committee on Fiscal Relations, passed at the recent Annual General Assembly (AGA) in Fredericton, calls on the JACFR, the AFN and ISC to engage extensively with First Nations about the report and bring back their findings to Chiefs-in-Assembly at the AFN Annual General Assembly in July 2020.

The report and the resolution both speak to the need to develop a structure that respects the diverse histories, circumstances and aspirations of First Nations from coast to coast to coast in ways that support and do not interfere with their path to self-determination. This will be a guiding principle of the engagements to roll out over the next year and whatever process follows. The vision is to develop a fiscal relationship that serves each First Nations path to a Nation to Nation and government to government relationship.

At the core of the vision of the JACFR report is the idea of a statutory transfer of funding to First Nations. A statutory transfer has been a key recommendation of studies such as the Penner Report in 1983, the report of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples in 1996, various Auditor General Reports and resolutions of Chiefs-in-Assembly. As First Nations move toward affirmation, implementation and enforcement of inherent and Treaty rights, title and jurisdiction, our governments must have the fiscal capacity to assert that jurisdiction. A statutory transfer, perhaps similar in structure to those provided to provinces and territories, is essential to ensuring that fiscal capacity exists.

Specifically, a statutory transfer must be based in Treaty. It must fully meet needs, address our full membership regardless of residence or status, rise with cost drivers such as inflation, and must reflect a fair share of the wealth that comes from our lands and resources as measured in Canada’s Gross Domestic Product. The vision and structure put forward in the JACFR report achieves all of this and more.

The report also speaks to the necessary infrastructure to sustain statutory transfers that meet the objective of truly closing the socio-economic gap, by measuring funding against progress toward comparable outcomes. This includes capacity building for First Nations governments and developing institutions that both First Nations and Canada can trust to provide objective information to everyone about that progress as well as the investments needed to fulfill the federal government’s promise of “sufficient, predictable and sustainable funding”.

There is much more in the report and I encourage you to read it and discuss it with your experts and your citizens. I encourage you as well to work with the JACFR in setting up an engagement process that works for you. Some regional meetings have already taken place and the JACFR will be reaching out over the next few months about building an engagement process that works for you and provides them the feedback they need to report back in a meaningful way at the next AGA.

I want to thank the members of the JACFR for their good work and their commitment in moving forward with this process: Chief Richard Sydney, Chief David Jimmie, Chief Lee Crowchild, Vice-Chief Heather Bear, Richard Nerysoo, Chief Laurie Carr, Chief Connie Lazore, John G. Paul, Don Drummond, Kevin Page, Bonnie Healy, Terry Goodtrack, and Harold Calla.

For more information about this report and the work on a new fiscal relationship, please contact Dan Wilson, Special Advisor at [email protected].

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Roy WhiteduckUpdate on New Fiscal Relationship – National Chief Perry Bellegarde Bulletin

The Government of Canada announces the coming into force of an Act respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth and families

on September 10, 2019

News release
Indigenous Services Canada

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Roy WhiteduckThe Government of Canada announces the coming into force of an Act respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth and families

The AFN Launches Honouring Promises: 2019 Election Priorities for First Nations and Canada

on September 9, 2019

(Ottawa, ON) – Today, Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde launched Honouring Promises: 2019 Federal Election Priorities for First Nations and Canada to provide a path forward for parties and candidates in the federal election. The document identifies a comprehensive set of commitments federal parties must make to First Nations to work together to build a stronger Canada.

“This country was founded on promises between First Nations and the newcomers to share the land and work together in the spirit of partnership and mutual respect,” said National Chief Bellegarde. “First Nations want federal parties to commit to the promises we are setting out today so we can move forward together. Our plan is ambitious and bold because we are making progress and we must maintain momentum. Canadians understand that First Nations priorities are Canada’s priorities. Honouring these promises will benefit everyone.”

Honouring Promises begins with a call for action on the global priority of climate change and preserving the natural world – a promise to the next seven generations. It shows how to build a stronger Canada through healthy and educated First Nations citizens living in safe and secure communities, and fully participating in the economy in ways that strengthen the national economy and sustain the environment.

Honouring Promises speaks to justice for First Nations, and a Canada where First Nations law is recognized as equal to common law and civil law, where First Nations rights and Treaties are recognized, respected and implemented.

“This election is taking place at a turning point in our shared history,” said National Chief Bellegarde. “This is our time to commit to action to save our planet and ourselves, to commit to ensure all children are equipped to build a prosperous future, and to commit to a promise that health, education, the economy and justice systems will work for everyone. The plan we call Honouring Promises points the way to real, transformative change. The time to act is now.”

The Honouring Promises: 2019 Federal Election Priorities for First Nations and Canada document, and other information on First Nations priorities and concerns, can be found on the AFN’s website here.

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada.  Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

For more information, please contact:

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 382
613-292-0857 (mobile)
[email protected]

Michael Hutchinson
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 201
613-859-6831 (cell)
[email protected] 

read more
Angie TurnerThe AFN Launches Honouring Promises: 2019 Election Priorities for First Nations and Canada
Assembly of First Nations
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