News

ASSEMBLY OF FIRST NATIONS BULLETIN – AFN Special Chiefs Assembly, December 6-8

on December 15, 2022

More than 1700 First Nations leaders, Elders, Knowledge Keepers, Women, Youth and Veterans from across Canada joined together in person and virtually from December 6 to 8, 2022 for the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) Special Chiefs Assembly (SCA) hosted by Kitigan Zibi Anishnabeg. First Nations-in-Assembly assessed progress and deliberated First Nations priorities ranging from child welfare to gun registration.

First Nations-in-Assembly passed a total of 23 resolutions, including two directing the AFN on a path forward on compensation and long-term reform for children and families harmed by the Government of Canada’s discriminatory funding of the First Nations Child and Family Services (FNCFS) Program and narrow application of Jordan’s Principle, 10 supporting Indian Residential School Survivors, and resolutions supporting  public safety and better government accountability for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls and Two Spirit people (MMIWG2S+). Final resolutions will be available on the AFN website in January 2023.

In her remarks, AFN National Chief RoseAnne Archibald reaffirmed her commitment to gender equity, First Nations children and families, and MMIWG2S+.

Special guest Independent Special Interlocutor for Missing Children and Unmarked Graves and Burial Sites associated with Indian Residential Schools Kimberley Murray addressed the Special Chiefs Assembly. She remarked that a family’s right to know what happened to their loved ones, how they died and where they are buried also applies to the families of women whose remains are believed to be in a landfill in Winnipeg.

The AFN also welcomed the Right Honourable Justin Trudeau, New Democratic Party Leader Jagmeet Singh, Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre (by video), and federal ministers, including Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations Marc Miller, Minister of Indigenous Services Canada Patty Hajdu, Minister of Public Safety Canada Marco Mendicino and Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada David Lametti.

The AFN Circle of Trade welcomed SCA participants and featured 39 businesses, organizations and sponsors – many of which were First Nations and Indigenous – offering networking opportunities with industry experts.

The AFN thanks First Nations leadership, delegates and sponsors for their active participation in the 2022 SCA and wishes everyone a safe, healthy and restful holiday season. We look forward to continuing to build a healing path forward for First Nations and all Canadians now and in the coming year.

read more
Roy WhiteduckASSEMBLY OF FIRST NATIONS BULLETIN – AFN Special Chiefs Assembly, December 6-8

AFN FIRST NATIONS-IN-ASSEMBLY PASS RESOLUTIONS BY CONSENSUS ON COMPENSATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES

on December 9, 2022

(Ottawa, ON) – The Assembly of First Nations (AFN) announced that First Nations-in-Assembly have passed two crucial resolutions this week directing the AFN on a path forward on compensation and long-term reform. One resolution advances the AFN’s priorities on securing compensation for First Nations children and families who experienced egregious harms caused by the Government of Canada’s discriminatory funding of the First Nations Child and Family Services (FNCFS) Program and narrow application of Jordan’s Principle, and the other outlines the path forward for the AFN’s ongoing participation in negotiations on long-term reforms.

During the Special Chiefs Assembly, Regional Chief Cindy Woodhouse, First Nation Chiefs, lawyers, technicians, and other representatives, including Dr. Cindy Blackstock of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada, with the guidance of the Honourable Justice Murray Sinclair, collaborated on Draft Resolution 16&17/2022 and Draft Resolution 19&20/2022. The resolutions, both carried unanimously by Chiefs and Proxies, uniting First Nations on the direction for continued negotiations to finalize the approach to compensation and long-term reform to the FNCFS Program and Jordan’s Principle.

Draft Resolution 16&17/2022 supports the payment of compensation for all survivors and victims of the Government of Canada’s discriminatory funding of the First Nations Child and Family Services (FNCFS) Program and narrow application of Jordan’s Principle. It mandates continued support for AFN Representative Plaintiffs and to ensure swift payment of compensation.

“The most important thing about what’s happening here is unity,” said Chair Khelsilem of Squamish Nation, mover of the resolution. “We are coming together as First Nations leaders. Because united, we can do anything we want and take on this government and get the full compensation for all the children, the full dignity for all our families. That’s what happens when we come together and work together.”

On December 8, the First Nations-in-Assembly passed a second resolution mandating the parameters needed for a final settlement agreement on long-term reforms to the FNCFS Program and Jordan’s Principle. The resolution directs the AFN to press Canada to increase funding commitments above the currently allocated $19.087 billion, over five years and beyond, in keeping with the principles of sovereignty, inherent jurisdiction, and nation building. It also mandates AFN to direct parties to develop evidence and policy-based options for the long-term reform of Jordan’s Principle that will include mechanisms to support self-determination.

“This resolution demands change to the child welfare system to support First Nations children and families to thrive through a holistic approach to reform grounded in our culture, and funding that meets the actual needs of our children and communities,” said Kevin Hart, Proxy for Chief Oliver Owens, Little Grand Rapids First Nation. “We must focus on prevention and supporting families to stay together.”

AFN Manitoba Regional Chief Cindy Woodhouse, lead negotiator and Social Development portfolio holder, spoke to the First Nations-in-Assembly during the passing of the resolutions. “First Nations have come together in unity to stand up for our children who were impacted by the biased child and family welfare system and Jordan’s Principle,” she said. “Now we look to Canada to do what’s necessary to fulfill these requirements for providing adequate and rapid compensation and work with First Nations communities to reform the system so that families are no longer torn apart. We as First Nations are clearly focused on the best interests of our children and families that give them the full dignity they deserve, and we’re ready to resolve these issues. It’s time for Canada to come back to the table with us.”

Additional details, resources and support are available at www.fnchildcompensation.ca.

The Assembly of First Nations (AFN) is a national advocacy organization that works to advance the collective aspirations of First Nations individuals and communities across Canada on matters of national or international nature and concern.  Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

―30―

Contact information:

Kelly Reid
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-292-0857 (mobile)
[email protected]

read more
Celso CercadoAFN FIRST NATIONS-IN-ASSEMBLY PASS RESOLUTIONS BY CONSENSUS ON COMPENSATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES

AFN STANDS WITH FAMILY OF MORGAN BEATRICE HARRIS AND ALL MMIWG2S+ DEMANDING DIGNITY AND JUSTICE

on December 8, 2022

(Ottawa, ON) – The Assembly of First Nations stands with the families of Morgan Beatrice Harris and Marcedes Myran, who were honoured with a blanketing ceremony by AFN Women’s Council Vice Chair Doris Anderson and Knowledge Keeper Dr. Gwen Point in a ceremony during the AFN Special Chiefs Assembly.

Before the ceremony, Harris’ daughters Cambria and Kera addressed the Assembly. “I want my mother to be remembered as a strong, resilient woman,” said Cambria. Kera called for the shutdown of Prairie Green Landfill so her mother’s remains can be found and receive a proper burial, or a memorial be created.

AFN National Chief RoseAnne Archibald told the Assembly that justice for MMIWG2S+ people remains a high priority and acknowledged the strength of Cambria and Kera. Harris’ and Myran’s remains are believed to be in the Prairie Green Landfill north of Winnipeg. Harris, Myran, Rebecca Contois and Mashkode Bizhiki’ikwe (Buffalo Woman) were allegedly murdered by a suspected serial killer.

“If these were non-Indigenous women, the search for their bodies would happen without delay,” said National Chief Archibald, echoing the words of Kera Harris in a private meeting Wednesday. “Morgan Beatrice Harris, Marcedes Myran, Rebecca Contois and Buffalo Woman deserve the dignity to be brought home and buried with proper ceremony.”

“I mourn with Cambria and Kera. How many more women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people must be lost before the federal government implements its National Action Plan and the 231 Calls to Justice?” said Chief Connie Big Eagle, AFN Women’s Council Chair.

BCAFN Regional Chief Terry Teegee and AFN Regional Chief Quebec/Labrador Ghislain Picard share the portfolio for Justice and are pushing for policing reforms from coast to coast to coast.

“We’ve seen a lot of talk but too little meaningful action to address not only systemic violence, but the inadequate response by police that devalues First Nations women and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people,” said Regional Chief Teegee. Winnipeg Police announced they would not search the Prairie Green Landfill north of Winnipeg for safety reasons.

Regional Chief Picard expressed his sorrow at the recent events in Winnipeg. “I offer my condolences to the families of the women killed in Manitoba. I encourage all Canadians to stand up and address the systemic racism in the institutions that have failed these women. I also call on Winnipeg Police to take any steps necessary to find the remains of these women and bring them home to bring closure to their families,” said Regional Chief Picard.

A Final Report and 231 Calls for Justice were made by the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls on June 3, 2019. On June 3, 2021, the Government of Canada released its 2021 Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ People National Action Plan: Ending Violence Against Indigenous Women, Girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ People (National Action Plan) and the Federal Pathway to Address Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ People (Federal Pathway). To date, progress has been slow to implement the Calls to Justice, National Action Plan and Federal Pathway, and First Nations-in-Assembly passed a resolution calling for the federal government to accelerate implementation of the National Action Plan and 231 Calls for Justice.

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations people in Canada.  Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

 

―30―

 

For more information please contact:

Matthew Bisson
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
[email protected]

Annette Schroeter
Communications Officer
BCAFN
[email protected]
250-962-1603

Marie-Celine Einish
Communications Advisor
AFNQL/APNQL
418-842-5020 (mobile)
[email protected]

read more
Roy WhiteduckAFN STANDS WITH FAMILY OF MORGAN BEATRICE HARRIS AND ALL MMIWG2S+ DEMANDING DIGNITY AND JUSTICE

AFN STANDS WITH KIASHKE ZAAGING ANISHINAABEK (GULL BAY FIRST NATION) IN ACTION AGAINST CANADA FOR INEQUITABLE FUNDING AND SUPPORT FOR FIRST NATION POLICE SERVICES

on December 5, 2022

(Ottawa, ON) – Today, Kiashke Zaaging Anishinaabek (Gull Bay First Nation) Chief Wilfred King has launched a legal action in Federal Court against Public Safety Canada and other federal departments in response to the inequitable funding of First Nations Police Services. King, along with Legal Counsel Chantelle Bryson (Potestio Law) announced the legal action during a media conference on Parliament Hill.

Assembly of First Nations (AFN) Regional Chief Quebec/Labrador Ghislain Picard is supportive of the legal challenge. “For too long, First Nations communities’ safety has been compromised due to a lack of funding for First Nations police services. The federal government’s take it or leave it approach to funding these police services have resulted in tragedy, as we have recently seen in James Smith Cree Nation. This legal challenge is necessary to address this longstanding issue.”

First Nations are over-represented in the justice system. Systemic racism, over-policing and police misconduct have long been studied and action is overdue. The AFN is working on developing and implementing a statutory framework recognizing First Nations Police Services as essential services with equitable funding and capacity supports.

First Nations must lead development and implementation of community safety and security action plans that support culturally appropriate models to policing are also a must.

Kiashke Zaaging Anishinaabek participates in the Public Safety Canada First Nation and Inuit Policing Facilities Program through funding agreements administered by the Ontario First Nation Policing Agreement between the province and the federal government. First Nations Police officers are paid far less than provincial and municipal counterparts, with fewer benefits and little to no raise opportunities, and pension.

At today’s press conference, Chief King stressed that the lack of sufficient funding through this program has jeopardized his community’s public safety. “Currently we have a compliment of three police officers, one that’s on extended sick leave. Therefore, we only have two officers on duty. There are times when we have no police services whatsoever.”

The current funding model leaves First Nations Police Services without basic equipment and operations needs, including police stations, satellite phones in areas without cell coverage, and support staff.

Public Safety Minister Marco Mendicino‘a has announced intentions to designate First Nations Police as an essential service, however, no funding details for this designation have been revealed.

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations people in Canada.  Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

―30―

For more information please contact:

Matthew Bisson
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
[email protected]

Marie-Celine Einish
Communications Advisor
AFNQL/APNQL
418-842-5020 (mobile)
[email protected]

read more
Celso CercadoAFN STANDS WITH KIASHKE ZAAGING ANISHINAABEK (GULL BAY FIRST NATION) IN ACTION AGAINST CANADA FOR INEQUITABLE FUNDING AND SUPPORT FOR FIRST NATION POLICE SERVICES

ASSEMBLY OF FIRST NATIONS WILL CONTINUE TO FIGHT FOR FIRST NATIONS JURISDICTION AS AFFIRMED IN AN ACT RESPECTING FIRST NATIONS, INUIT AND MÉTIS CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES

on December 5, 2022

(Ottawa, ON) – The Assembly of First Nations (AFN) announced today that it continues to stand with First Nations in Quebec and all First Nations’ who exercise their inherent jurisdiction over child and family law. First Nations interveners, including the AFN, will appear in a hearing before the Supreme Court of Canada to support the constitutionality of the Act and its full implementation following the Government of Quebec challenging the law’s constitutionality. In addition, the legislation requires the establishment of an oversight committee appointed in part by the Federal government.

“Advancing First Nations priorities requires recognizing First Nations law-making powers,” said AFN Quebec-Labrador Regional Chief Ghislain Picard. “We continue to ask for this recognition and for sovereignty in our nations.”

The Court of Appeal of Quebec affirmed the constitutionality of the Act on February 10, 2022, in response to the Quebec government’s challenge to the constitutionality of the Act, which came into force January 1, 2020.  The ruling affirmed that First Nations have an inherent right to self-government, including jurisdiction over child protection and family law.

“The Act is the positive result of decades of advocacy to respect First Nations systems that support the best interests of our families,” said AFN Manitoba Regional Chief Cindy Woodhouse, portfolio holder on the AFN Executive Committee. “My hope is that these hearings result in a stronger process for implementation.”

Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations 1st Vice-Chief David Pratt added, “The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) would like to acknowledge our membership and all First Nations on the significance of the Supreme Court of Canada Quebec appeal hearing on C-92 respecting First Nations, Inuit, and Metis children and families (the Act). This case is monumental as it will affect not only child welfare laws, but every aspect of First Nations’ jurisdiction and right to self-determination. FSIN is fully committed to the implementation of the Act and are working towards bringing our children home and out of the hands of the Provinces and Territories. This precedent will impact Treaty and Inherent rights and whether the court will recognize our right to raise our children surrounded by their language, culture, history and land.”

The hearings begin this week with appearances from First Nations leaders. The Supreme Court of Canada’s decision is expected in 2023.

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations people in Canada.  Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

 

―30―

 

For more information please contact:

Kelly Reid
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-292-0857 (mobile)
[email protected]

read more
Roy WhiteduckASSEMBLY OF FIRST NATIONS WILL CONTINUE TO FIGHT FOR FIRST NATIONS JURISDICTION AS AFFIRMED IN AN ACT RESPECTING FIRST NATIONS, INUIT AND MÉTIS CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES

FIRST NATIONS LEADERS GATHER DURING HEARINGS ON THE ACT C-92, AN ACT RESPECTING FIRST NATIONS, METIS AND INUIT CHILDREN AND FAMILIES AND THE POTENTIAL PASSING OF BILL C-29

on December 3, 2022

(Ottawa, ON): First Nations leaders appearing this week during hearings at the Supreme Court of Canada on An Act respecting First Nations, Inuit, and Metis children, youth and families (Act C-92) and the potential passing of Bill C-29, which would establish an oversight committee regarding the Act’s implementation. Assembly of First Nations (AFN) Manitoba Regional Chief Cindy Woodhouse, AFN Quebec and Labrador Regional Chief Ghislain Picard, and Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations Vice Chief David Pratt will address the media on these hearings, the need for the full implementation of the Act, and the ongoing fight for First Nations self-determination.

DATE:
December 5, 2022

 TIME:
12:00 p.m. EST

 LOCATION:
Westin Ottawa
11 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, ON

 

The Assembly of First Nations (AFN) is a national advocacy organization that works to advance the collective aspirations of First Nations individuals and communities across Canada on matters of national or international nature and concern. Follow the AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

 

-30-

For more information please contact:

 Kelly Reid
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-292-0857 (mobile)
[email protected]

Ayman Hammamieh
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
[email protected]

Matthew Bisson
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
[email protected]

read more
Roy WhiteduckFIRST NATIONS LEADERS GATHER DURING HEARINGS ON THE ACT C-92, AN ACT RESPECTING FIRST NATIONS, METIS AND INUIT CHILDREN AND FAMILIES AND THE POTENTIAL PASSING OF BILL C-29

FIRST NATIONS FROM COAST TO COAST TO COAST TO GATHER IN OTTAWA FOR AFN SPECIAL CHIEFS ASSEMBLY DECEMBER 6-8

on November 30, 2022

(Ottawa, ON): Hundreds of First Nations leadership, Chiefs, Knowledge Keepers, Elders, youth, women and 2SLGBTQ+ people from across the country will gather on the territory of the Algonquin in Ottawa, ON for the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) Special Chiefs Assembly (SCA) next week.

DATES:            December 6 to 8, 2022

LOCATION:      Westin Ottawa

                        11 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, ON

Media accreditation is required, and media are encouraged to pre-register online: meetings.afn.ca. There is no cost for accredited media to attend. Media access is not available during dialogue sessions December 5, 2022. Media are not permitted to record the early-morning Pipe Ceremony.

ASSEMBLY HIGHLIGHTS:

Date Time (EST) Details
Tuesday, December 6, 2022 10:00 a.m. Grand Entry

Opening Remarks by National Chief RoseAnne Archibald

Wednesday, December 7, 2022 5:30 p.m. Guest Speakers – by Invitation: Federal Party Leaders, Ministers
Thursday, December 8, 2022 10:00 a.m. Guest Speakers – by Invitation: Federal Party Leaders, Ministers
3:30 p.m. Guest Speakers – by Invitation: Ministers
4:00 p.m. Closing Remarks by National Chief RoseAnne Archibald

 

Review the provisional agenda online for the AFN Virtual Special Chiefs Assembly. Updates will be posted on afn.ca as they become available.

To register to attend the AFN Special Chiefs Assembly in person or virtually, please visit the AFN website: Special Chiefs Assembly 2022 | Assembly of First Nations (afn.ca)

The Special Chiefs Assembly may be viewed at cpac.ca

The Assembly of First Nations (AFN) is a national advocacy organization that works to advance the collective aspirations of First Nations individuals and communities across Canada on matters of national or international nature and concern. Follow the AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

-30-

For more information please contact:

Kelly Reid
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-292-0857 (mobile)
[email protected]

Ayman Hammamieh
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
[email protected]

Matthew Bisson
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
[email protected]

read more
Celso CercadoFIRST NATIONS FROM COAST TO COAST TO COAST TO GATHER IN OTTAWA FOR AFN SPECIAL CHIEFS ASSEMBLY DECEMBER 6-8

Update on Compensation and Long-Term Reform to the First Nations Child and Family Services Program and Jordan’s Principle

on November 25, 2022

SUMMARY: 

  • On November 23, 2022, the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) filed an application for judicial review of the recent Canadian Human Rights Tribunal’s (CHRT) decision regarding a proposed settlement on the payment of compensation to victims of Canada’s discrimination under the First Nations Child and Family Services Program and Jordan’s Principle.
  • The AFN signed a final settlement agreement (FSA) for compensation, including a full compensation package and provisions on eligibility and the application process on June 30, 2022. The compensation is capped at $20 billion for all the classes. The FSA settled the class action at the Federal Court and the CHRT for compensation intended to end both litigation matters.
  • In September 2022, the AFN sought the CHRT’s approval of the FSA on compensation, and on October 24, 2022, the CHRT released its decision that did not endorse the FSA. The CHRT’s failure to endorse the settlement agreement means that over 300,000 First Nations children, youth and their caregivers would not be entitled to compensation. Only half of the of these individuals are covered under the existing orders of the CHRT.
  • The AFN filed its judicial review to ensure that all individuals who were harmed by Canada’s discrimination between 1991 and 2022 would be entitled to compensation, as our settlement agreement includes more individuals, and will provide higher levels of compensation than under the CHRT’s compensation orders.

In 2007, the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) filed a human rights complaint, along with the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada, alleging that Canada was discriminating against First Nations children and families in the provision of child protection services and the implementation of Jordan’s Principle. In 2016, the Tribunal substantiated the complaint and ordered Canada to reform its First Nations Child and Family Services Program (FNCFS) program and properly implement Jordan’s Principle.

An essential element of AFN’s advocacy was the payment of fair and just compensation by Canada for its discrimination. The AFN‘s efforts have been to ensure compensation is paid to First Nations children, youth and their families.

In fact, compensation was made possible because of the AFN’s efforts. The AFN was the only party to the CHRT’s proceedings to request compensation to be paid directly to victims. AFN also asked that the maximum amount of $40,000 be paid.

However, the CHRT’s compensation orders had limitations. It only covered the period between 2006/7 and 2017/22. Secondly, not all individuals are entitled to compensation under the CHRT’s Orders. To be eligible to receive compensation under the CHRT process, one must have been removed from their homes, families, and community. They must meet all three parts of this criteria, which results in unfair application. For instance, a parent could have two children removed from their care. The child placed outside of their community would be entitled to compensation, but the child placed in their own community would not be eligible.

The AFN sought to correct this inherent unfairness in the CHRT compensation orders in the FSA. The AFN settlement agreement established a significant milestone in compensation. The agreement will provide compensation to all victims of Canada’s discrimination regardless of where they were placed.  The AFN’s settlement also provides compensation to those individuals who were impacted by Canada’s discrimination from 1991 to 2022 – extending 15 years beyond the timeframe of the CHRT’s compensation orders.

On November 23, the AFN Executive Committee agreed to launch a judicial review of the CHRT’s letter decision to not approve the final settlement agreement. The AFN does not agree that the CHRT could not approve the final settlement agreement. The Record of Decision is included below.

The AFN’s judicial review is mainly focused on getting more children and families compensation. We do not agree with the limitations, or the inherent unfairness imposed by the CHRT. Our children deserve better. They deserve compensation regardless of where they were placed.

The AFN is hopeful that this matter can be settled in a timely manner, without lengthy legal processes at the CHRT or the Federal Court of Canada. The AFN is exploring options on how to get compensation into the hands of First Nation individuals as quickly as possible. The AFN will continue to work with the Parties to get the best possible outcome for our children and families affected by Canada’s discrimination. Our important work on compensation continues at the negotiation table.

The AFN will continue to advocate for the approval of final settlement agreement that reflects First Nations’ priorities and is based on First Nations-led processes. Our current goal is to get to compensation to uncontested classes (i.e. removed children) as soon as possible. This may result in a staggered settlement process.

For additional information, please visit www.fnchildcompensation.ca and sign up to receive updates.

RECORDS OF DECISION

Executive Committee Meeting
November 23, 2022
1:00pm – 5:00pm (EDT)

MOTION 3:       CHRT  

  1. The Executive Committee reaffirm its desire and advocacy to date that all victims of Canada’s discrimination receive the payment of just compensation.
  2. The Executive Committee direct Legal Counsel to seek a Judicial Review of the CHRT’s decision on the Final Settlement Agreement on Compensation to address precedential errors made by the CHRT that will have an adverse impact on First Nations involved in human rights disputes.
  3. The Executive Committee uphold free, prior and informed consent when dealing internally with member First Nations, but direct Legal Counsel to seek a Judicial Review of the CHRT’s misinterpretation of the application of Free Prior and Informed Consent as it relates to the final settlement agreement on compensation.
  4. The Executive Committee direct that counsel engage in a dual track process whereby the judicial review is filed and negotiations continue.
  5. Every effort be made to pay compensation forthwith to those uncontentious classes of victims such as the removed class who may benefit from compensation at this time, while discussions or litigation continue for those groups that remain contested.

MOVED:            Regional Chief Joanna Bernard
SECONDED:     Chief Darlene Bernard
Opposed:          none
Abstentions:    Regional Chief Terry Teegee
Regional Chief Kluane Adamek
Regional Chief Bobby Cameron
Regional Chief Gerald Antoine
MOTION:           Carried

read more
Sid LeeUpdate on Compensation and Long-Term Reform to the First Nations Child and Family Services Program and Jordan’s Principle

REGIONAL CHIEF CINDY WOODHOUSE REACTS TO DECISION MADE BY THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA

on November 23, 2022

(Winnipeg, Manitoba): Today the Government of Canada filed a protective judicial review in response to the October decision by the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal regarding the Final Settlement Agreement (FSA) on Compensation that was agreed upon between the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) and the Government of Canada earlier this year.

As the AFN’s lead negotiator with Canada, Regional Chief Cindy Woodhouse will issue a statement and take questions from the media regarding this decision.

DATE:
November 23, 2022

 TIME:
4:45 p.m. EST

LOCATION:
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81682197662

 

Media representatives using a personal Zoom account are required to identify their name and news outlet to participate.

The Assembly of First Nations (AFN) is a national advocacy organization that works to advance the collective aspirations of First Nations individuals and communities across Canada on matters of national or international nature and concern. Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

-30-

 For more information please contact:

Kelly Reid
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-292-0857 (mobile)
[email protected] 

Lori Kittelberg
Acting Director of Communications
Assembly of First Nations
604-340-3117 (mobile)
[email protected]

read more
Roy WhiteduckREGIONAL CHIEF CINDY WOODHOUSE REACTS TO DECISION MADE BY THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA

ASSEMBLY OF FIRST NATIONS NAMED ONE OF CANADA’S TOP 100 EMPLOYERS

on November 21, 2022

(Ottawa, ON) – Canada’s Top 100 Employers (CT100) announced on Friday that the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) has been included in its 2023 list of the nation’s top organizations for employee satisfaction, workplace policies, personal wellness, and other criteria. Selection depends on direct feedback from employees using various digital survey tools.

“We’re pleased to be included in this year’s list of Canada’s Top 100 Employers for the first time in our organization’s HER-story,” says AFN National Chief RoseAnne Archibald. “Like the First Nations we serve, we’re a family-oriented organization at a time when matriarchal leadership is being revitalized.”

The AFN employs approximately 170 full-time staff and numerous contract- and part-time employees as well. In order to be selected for CT100, nearly all employees provided anonymous statements for evaluation. Employers are evaluated by the editors of Canada’s Top 100 Employers using eight criteria, which have remained consistent since the project’s inception:

(1) Physical Workplace;

(2) Work Atmosphere & Social;

(3) Health, Financial & Family Benefits;

(4) Vacation & Time Off;

(5) Employee Communications;

(6) Performance Management;

(7) Training & Skills Development; and

(8) Community Involvement.

“As National Chief, I strive every day to create a safe and healthy environment at the AFN. We appreciate others recognizing our progress on the healing path forward and the good work we accomplished in the face of a challenging year. We’re hopeful that 2023 will bring continued positive transformation while upholding our values, our cultures, our beliefs, and our seven sacred teachings.” says AFN National Chief RoseAnne Archibald.

The full list of 2023 winners were announced this morning in a special magazine published in The Globe and Mail in print and online.

Now in its 23rd annual edition, Canada’s Top 100 Employers is an editorial competition by MediaCorp that recognizes employers with exceptional human resources programs and forward-thinking workplace policies.

Founded in 1992, Mediacorp Canada Inc. is the nation’s largest publisher of employment periodicals. Since 1999, the Toronto-based publisher has managed the Canada’s Top 100 Employers project, which includes 18 regional and special-interest editorial competitions that reach millions of Canadians annually through a variety of magazine and newspaper partners, including The Globe and Mail.

The Assembly of First Nations (AFN) is a national advocacy organization that works to advance the collective aspirations of First Nations individuals and communities across Canada on matters of national or international nature and concern. Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

―30―

For more information please contact:

Andrew St. Germain
Office of the National Chief
416-543-1690 (mobile)
[email protected]

Kelly Reid
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-292-0857 (mobile)
[email protected]

read more
Celso CercadoASSEMBLY OF FIRST NATIONS NAMED ONE OF CANADA’S TOP 100 EMPLOYERS