News

Assembly Of First Nations Welcomes Supreme Court Ruling On Carbon Pricing Legislation

on March 26, 2021

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde welcomes yesterday’s Supreme Court of Canada decision on the Greenhouse Gas Pollution Pricing Act, urging all levels of government to respect First Nations rights, title, and jurisdiction and responsibilities to traditional territories in its implementation.

“Environmentalists and economists agree that putting a price on pollution is the most effective way to address climate change, and I welcome this decision as a way to help curb the impacts of climate change in our territories and across the country,” said AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde. “The recognition by the Supreme Court’s in its decision that climate change causes significant harm in the Canadian Arctic, on coastal communities and on Indigenous peoples is important. First Nations are often the first to feel the harmful effects of climate change. I reiterate the need for provincial and territorial governments to work together with First Nations as leaders in climate action to identify meaningful and effective solutions to address the impacts of climate change on our communities, infrastructure, ways of life and well-being.”

The Supreme Court of Canada ruled March 25 that the Greenhouse Gas Pollution Pricing Act (GGPPA) is constitutional.  The decision comes after Ontario, Saskatchewan and Alberta challenged the GGPPA legislation since it was first implemented in 2019 (ON and SK) and 2020 (AB). The provinces argued that the Act’s two-tiered carbon pricing was unconstitutional and undermined provincial authority over natural resources.

The AFN, based on direction from the Chiefs-in-Assembly, intervened in this case, as well as court cases in Saskatchewan, Ontario and Alberta, arguing the Government of Canada has a direct legal obligation to recognize Aboriginal and Treaty rights in any legislative efforts to address climate change.

“The impact of Climate Change is felt everywhere, especially in the north,” said AFN Yukon Regional Chief Kluane Adamek, Chair of the AFN Advisory Committee on Climate Action and the Environment.   “First Nations require immediate actions and rights based approaches.  While we embrace these efforts to mitigate the damage of greenhouse gas emissions, we stand firm that First Nations rights, title, and jurisdiction over their traditional territories is paramount when considering carbon pricing, and by extension climate solutions. First Nations have been leaders in proposing transformative strategies for environmental protection. We must ensure that following this Supreme Court ruling, implementation and enforcement of the GGPPA will respect First Nations jurisdiction, title and rights as stewards of the land.”

AFN Chiefs-in-Assembly, through Resolution 103/2017: Carbon Pricing Regimes mandates AFN to develop innovative solutions to the unique circumstances of First Nations, including the possibility of revenue recycling mechanisms that minimize the disproportionate effects of carbon pricing on First Nations. In Resolution 09/2018: Develop First Nations-Specific Solutions for the Green House Gas Pollution Pricing Act, Chiefs – in – Assembly reaffirmed these calls, in addition to the need for financial support for First Nations to explore the implications and opportunities of carbon pricing on their territories, including their participation in the clean energy economy.

 

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nation peoples in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter at @AFN_Updates.

 

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For more information please contact:
Kelly Reid
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
905-717-0062 (cell)
[email protected]

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Roy WhiteduckAssembly Of First Nations Welcomes Supreme Court Ruling On Carbon Pricing Legislation

Assembly of First Nations calls for sustained investments for water certainty

on February 26, 2021

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde says urgent action is required to end long-term boil water advisories and achieve water certainty in First Nations following yesterday’s release of a report by the Office of the Auditor General of Canada evaluating water-related commitments made by the federal government.

“Access to safe, clean water is more important now than ever to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 and keep us all safe,” said AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde.  “While there has been some progress to address and end boil water advisories, currently more than 50 remain, and one is too many. I continue to urge the federal government to work together with First Nations to implement long-term solutions that will provide water certainty for our children and families.  I want to see significant and sustained investments in water treatment and water distribution for First Nations, a renewed commitment by the federal government to end boil water advisories within realistic timelines and real investments in First Nations infrastructure to close the infrastructure gap by 2030.”

The report Access to Safe Drinking Water in First Nations released today by the Office of the Auditor General of Canada highlights three main areas of concern:  the commitment by Indigenous Services Canada to eliminate long-term drinking water advisories, the operations and maintenance policy for water and wastewater and the now 30-year-old funding formula, and potential for a regulatory framework.

Indigenous Services Canada Minister Marc Miller announced recently the government will not meet their target to end long-term boil water advisories by March 2021. To date at least 57 long-term advisories are in place across Canada.

“Water is sacred to First Nations and key to the health and well-being of all living things,” said National Chief Bellegarde. “We must see the human right to safe drinking water prioritized by our government partners. Sustained funding, including investments in operations and maintenance that reflect the true costs, not formula-driven numbers, is the only way to address long-standing issues and ensure safe drinking water for our people and nations.”

In the 2019 Speech from the Throne, the federal government committed to “continue the work of eliminating all long-term drinking water advisories on reserve by 2021 and ensure safe drinking water in First Nations.” The repeal and replacement of the Safe Drinking Water for First Nations Act, together with co-developed legislation, continues to be a priority for First Nations as a necessary step to ensuring the future of safe drinking water in First Nations across the country.

AFN is hosting virtual engagement sessions with First Nations leaders and water experts on the repeal and replacement of the Safe Drinking Water for First Nations Act this week.

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nation peoples in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter at @AFN_Updates.

For more information please contact:
Karen Joyner
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-292-0857 (cell)
[email protected]

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Celso CercadoAssembly of First Nations calls for sustained investments for water certainty

Assembly of First Nations Knowledge Keepers demand serious action to ensure clean drinking water for All First Nations

on February 17, 2021

(Ottawa, ON) – On the first day of a national virtual gathering focused on protecting water in uncertain times hosted by the Assembly of First Nations (AFN), a committee of Knowledge Keepers representing First Nations from coast to coast to coast delivered the following statement:

“Water is life. Access to safe drinking water is a basic human right.

It flows through all of us. Through plants and animals. It is our lifeblood, essential to our sustenance and survival.

Why then is water inaccessible for so many First Nations? There are currently at minimum 57 long-term drinking water advisories in 39 First Nations across Canada, some of which have been active for more than 20 years. How can Government of Canada continue to neglect our peoples and nations, our children and families? Situations like those in Neskatanga First Nation, Shoal Lake No.40 First Nation, and Eabametoong First Nation would be unacceptable in an urban center in Canada. Is there a reason, then, that decades’ long advisories are a reality for First Nations?

As Bedahbun Moonias from Neskatanga First Nation said, ‘Sometimes I feel like we don’t exist…we’re just ghosts put away in a drawer.’

Just as our ancestors and grandmothers have performed water ceremonies since time immemorial, First Nations have understood that water is sacred and must be protected, appreciated, and honoured. Water is what connects all facets of our lives as First Nations peoples. It is in our traditional ways of hunting and fishing. It is in our ceremonies and in our songs. Without clean water, the fabric of our culture will surely collapse. The poison that infects our water chains us to failure, to declining health, and to lives that will always be tied to danger.

First Nations peoples have the right to clean drinking water as stated in the United Nations Resolution 64/292, Human Right to Water and Sanitation. The Resolution, “[recognizes] the right to safe and clean drinking water and sanitation as a human right that is essential for the full enjoyment of life and all human rights.” At the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) Annual General Assembly in July 2019, the Chiefs-in-Assembly, through AFN Resolution 53/2019 Human Right to Clean Drinking Water, called on the federal government to “immediately remove bureaucratic barriers and systemic failures in guidelines and policies which lead to the denial of the basic human right to clean drinking water to the residents of Attawapiskat First Nation, and all other First Nation communities who are experiencing similar problems,” and yet there are still First Nations being denied access to this right. Canada has failed and continues to fail First Nations in these regards.

We will continue to stand up for our human rights, our treaty rights, and for the protection of Mother Earth’s water. It is our sincere hope that we will not have to fight much longer. Already, the Government of Canada acknowledged that it will not meet its own original deadline of March 2021 to ensure that all First Nations’ drinking water is safe. It is no wonder then that so many First Nations have lost faith in the government’s ability to live up to their word.

Time and time again, First Nations have been united in our hardships. We have had to speak with a united voice in order to be heard and understood by Canada. So again, we ask that First Nations peoples be offered the same treatment as all Canadians. Is there a deeper and more dangerous reason as to why we have been forced to live without this basic right for so long? Is this failure racially based? How can this inaction be allowed to happen?

It is paramount that Canada commits to ending the water crisis faced by First Nations across the country. If this continues to be pushed aside, if First Nations are continually told that their lives hold no value, then we will know for certain that Canada sees us only as ghosts.”

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter at @AFN_Updates.

For more information please contact:
Karen Joyner
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-292-0857 (cell)
[email protected]

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Celso CercadoAssembly of First Nations Knowledge Keepers demand serious action to ensure clean drinking water for All First Nations

The Circle Digital Edition – Winter Issue 1/2020

on February 5, 2021

(Ottawa, ON) – It’s been said many times throughout 2020, but this year has certainly been unprecedented. We’ve faced challenge after challenge globally, nationally and locally. From the devastating COVID-19 pandemic to the protests against systemic racism to the ongoing fight for our inherent and Treaty rights to be recognized and upheld, we have been asked to come up against many obstacles. And though it is difficult to see the positive from where we stand in the midst of these trials, there is much for us be proud of and to take pride in.

I see positivity in the way we have built and upheld community during this trying time. Nations have come together to support one another and ensure that we are all safe and well. Stories of people of all ages volunteering their time to care for their Elders through acts of kindness – from buying and delivering groceries and supplies to writing letters to stave off loneliness – show the true resilience and solidarity that we, as First Nations, are known for. Each act of giving back is an act of love that… (Click to read more)

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nation peoples in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter at @AFN_Updates.

For more information please contact:
Assembly of First Nations – Communications
[email protected]
(613) 241-6789

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Sid LeeThe Circle Digital Edition – Winter Issue 1/2020

National Chief Welcomes Step Toward Distinctions-Based Health Legislation for First Nations

on January 28, 2021

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde welcomes today’s announcement by Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller to engage with First Nations and Indigenous leaders to transform the health system in Canada.

Minister Miller today announced efforts toward the co-development of distinctions-based health legislation, starting with pre-engagement consultation with First Nations, Metis and Inuit taking place over the next few months.

“I welcome this initiative and step toward addressing the inequities and discrimination toward First Nations and other Indigenous peoples in Canada’s health care systems,” said AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde, adding he is encouraged that the federal government is moving ahead on commitments from the Fall 2020 Throne Speech and Economic Statement. “Long-standing inequities, underscored by the COVID-19 pandemic, continue to result in poor health outcomes for First Nations across Canada. Any proposed process must include the rights and title holders and be grounded in First Nations control over the development and delivery of health services with priorities identified by First Nations.”

“Developing distinctions-based health legislation for First Nations must be done with the leadership at the decision-making tables from the outset. It must at the same time include the important work to enforce the treaty right to health, including implementation of the spirit and intent of the medicine chest clause,” said AFN Regional Chief Marlene Poitras who is the health portfolio lead on the AFN Executive. “This legislation must provide the basis for a health system that addresses systemic racism, is respectful of the individual needs of our people, and treated as foundational, a cornerstone of Canada’s overall healthcare system.”

In 2017 AFN Chiefs-in-Assembly passed resolution 69/2017, directing the AFN to explore a legislative base for First Nations Health that is reflective of inherent, Treaty and international legal requirements, as well at the nation to nation relationship.

The announcement comes after a two-day virtual meeting on anti-Indigenous racism in Canada’s health care systems with federal, provincial and territorial ministers and First Nations, Metis and Inuit leaders where National Chief Bellegarde reiterated recommendations and called for urgency in addressing systemic racism in Canada’s health care systems.

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter at @AFN_Updates.

For more information please contact:
Karen Joyner
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-292-0857 (cell)
[email protected]

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Angie TurnerNational Chief Welcomes Step Toward Distinctions-Based Health Legislation for First Nations

National Chief Calls for Immediate Engagement with First Nations to Address Racism in Canada’s Health Systems

on January 28, 2021

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde reiterated recommendations and called for urgency in addressing systemic racism in Canada’s health care systems at a two-day virtual meeting with federal, provincial and territorial ministers and Metis and Inuit leaders that ended today.

“We need to stop debating whether systemic racism exists,” said AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde. “Joyce Echaquan and too many others have left us a vivid record of the tragic consequences of systemic racism in the institutions we all seek for help, safety and care. We need urgent action by provinces and territories to engage First Nations to develop a plan and strategies to ensure safety and accountability. We’re not going to end racism in Canada’s health systems tomorrow, but we need to take actions now.”

The meeting, convened by Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller, Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett and Health Minister Patty Hajdu, gathered Indigenous leaders and health system experts to discuss short and long-term strategies to eliminate anti-Indigenous racism in Canada’s health care systems. It is the second of its kind since the death of Joyce Echaquan in hospital September 2020.

“There seems to be a shared sense of responsibility by all parties to addressing racism in the health care system, but until First Nations and Indigenous peoples are treated with the respect, quality of care and attention they deserve, meetings of this nature will not have the impact that’s required,” said National Chief Bellegarde. “Implementation of recommendations and reporting on their progress and outcomes will be essential.”

In his comments, National Chief Bellegarde reiterated with urgency the recommendations shared at a similar meeting held in October 2020.

National Chief Bellegarde also underscored the need for the COVID-19 vaccination roll-out in First Nations communities to be a priority.

“Until we close the gap in quality of life between First Nations and the rest of Canada, the health needs of our people will continue to be much greater and more urgent than those of non-Indigenous Canadians. And this matters most in a pandemic,” said National Chief Bellegarde. “First Nations continue to be disproportionately impacted by COVID-19 as a result of crowded homes and lack of clean water and should be prioritized for immunizations.”

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter at @AFN_Updates.

For more information please contact:
Karen Joyner
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-292-0857 (cell)
[email protected]

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Angie TurnerNational Chief Calls for Immediate Engagement with First Nations to Address Racism in Canada’s Health Systems

National Chief welcomes federal investment in Indigenous Covid-19 response

on January 13, 2021

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde welcomes today’s announcement by Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller to invest in Indigenous communities to better respond to COVID-19. The investment comes after a January 7 letter from National Chief Bellegarde to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau urging the government to take action to address the growing rate of COVID-19 infections among First Nation people across the country.

“Keeping our people and nations safe remains top priority, particularly at a time when infection rates are rising and risk getting completely out of control,” said National Chief Bellegarde, adding that First Nations are disproportionately impacted by the pandemic and require resources to meet needs exacerbated by remoteness, crowded homes and lack of clean water. “I lift up First Nations leadership across the country for speaking up. Our voices have been heard.  We will save lives.”

Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller today announced $1.2 Billion, which includes support for public health, further investments in the Indigenous Community Support Fund and Supportive Care for long-term care and Elder care facilities.

“It’s essential we work together and that the approach is coordinated, with First Nations taking the lead,” said National Chief Bellegarde. “I am encouraged by Minister Miller’s commitment to First Nations having flexibility to respond to needs and will continue to press provincial and territorial governments to support and work together with First Nations as we respond to this crisis. This includes access to mental health supports for our front-line workers and community members.”

National Chief Bellegarde made it clear this week he will be getting his COVID-19 vaccine when his turn comes.

“Just like wearing a mask, getting the vaccine is about keeping you and those around you safe,” said National Chief Bellegarde. “If you don’t plan to do it for yourself, please consider doing it for your family, friends and community. Together we’ll conquer COVID-19.”

 

For more details on today’s funding announcement, read this press release from the Indigenous Services Canada website.

 

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter at @AFN_Updates.

 

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For more information please contact:
Karen Joyner
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-292-0857 (cell)
[email protected]

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Roy WhiteduckNational Chief welcomes federal investment in Indigenous Covid-19 response

National Chief Pleased With Thunder Bay Verdict Ruling Brayden Bushby Guilty of Manslaughter

on December 14, 2020

(Ottawa, ON) – National Chief Perry Bellegarde of the Assembly of First Nations said today’s verdict in the trailer hitch manslaughter case is a welcome surprise.  

“This is a significant verdict for First Nations and a wonderful day for Canadian justice,” said National Chief Bellegarde. “First Nations have faced an uphill battle to receive fairness in the judicial system. Perhaps today’s decision demonstrates that courts in this country will begin treating crimes against First Nations (among Black, Indigenous and people of colour) the same as they do attacks on non-Indigenous Canadians. This seems to be a major step in the right direction, but we must remain vigilant if we are to root out institutional racism in our justice system.”

This afternoon, Justice Helen Pierce of the Thunder Bay court ruled Bushby guilty of manslaughter and aggravated assault, which he plead guilty of prior to today’s verdict. Bushby threw a trailer hitch from a moving vehicle, hitting Barbara Kentner in the abdomen. Kentner, 34 at the time, from Wabigoon Lake Ojibway Nation, later died of internal injuries. Bushby’s lawyers claimed the injuries were unrelated to the assault. Bushby, who was 18 and drunk at the time of the incident, admitted to having thrown the hitch. 

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter at @AFN_Updates. 

For more information please contact:
Karen Joyner
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-292-0857 (cell)
[email protected]

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Celso CercadoNational Chief Pleased With Thunder Bay Verdict Ruling Brayden Bushby Guilty of Manslaughter

First Nations leaders and delegates to gather virtually Tuesday and Wednesday for the 41st AFN Annual General Assembly

on December 7, 2020

(Ottawa, ON) – For the first time, hundreds of First Nations Chiefs, leaders, Elders and youth are gathering virtually on December 8-9, 2020 for the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) Annual General Assembly (AGA). This year’s theme, “All Our Relations: Emerging Stronger Together”, sets the tone as COVID-19 leads First Nations through a challenging, unprecedented year.

AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde will deliver his opening address on December 8, at approximately 11:00 a.m. (EST). The AGA will feature discussion and decision-making on key priorities for First Nations, such as COVID-19, the UN Declaration, systemic racism, infrastructure, among other topics.

In addition, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will address Chiefs across Canada at the event on December 9, at 4:15 p.m. (EST).

On the evening of December 8, starting at 7:00 p.m. (EST), delegates will hear from federal representatives including:

  • Carolyn Bennett, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations
  • David Lametti, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada
  • Marc Miller, Minister of Indigenous Services
  • Steven Guilbeault, Minister of Canadian Heritage
  • Bill Blair, Minister of Public Safety

To see the provisional agenda, and find updates and information on the 2020 AGA, please visit the AGA website: https://www.afn.ca/2020-annual-general-assembly.
Media accreditation is required. We encourage media to register through Angie Turner at [email protected].

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada.  Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

For more information please contact:
Karen Joyner
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-292-0857 (cell)
[email protected]

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Sid LeeFirst Nations leaders and delegates to gather virtually Tuesday and Wednesday for the 41st AFN Annual General Assembly

National Chief Bulletin: Update on Federal Bill to advance implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

on December 3, 2020

SUMMARY:

  • Since my last Bulletin, Minister of Justice David Lametti tabled Bill C-15, United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act on December 3rd, 2020.
  • This proposed legislation is the culmination of generations of advocacy by First Nations nationally and internationally. Chiefs-in-Assembly have repeatedly called for implementation legislation for the Declaration since it was adopted by the UN General Assembly 13 years ago. Assembly of First Nations (AFN) Resolution 86/2019 Support for Federal Legislation to Create a Framework to Implement the UN Declaration called for the introduction of federal legislation by the end of 2020. The federal government responded with a commitment to do so, in the Speech from the Throne in 2019 and 2020.
  • Preliminary legal analysis indicates that Bill C-15 contains key elements that Chiefs-in-Assembly mandated the AFN to work toward. It is consistent with former Private Member’s Bill C-262 as ‘the floor’ and contains several enhancements. It contains strong language affirming our inherent right to self-determination, highlights the urgent need to respect and promote our rights affirmed in Treaties and commits the Government of Canada to an action plan that includes measures to combat and eliminate all forms of violence and discrimination, including systemic discrimination.
  • I invite all Chiefs, Proxies and First Nations to attend the forthcoming AFN Virtual Annual General Assembly on December 8-9 (Registration) where this critical legislation will be discussed. The Prime Minister and Minister of Justice will attend on December 8th. On December 9th, a plenary panel will present on this development and provide legal analysis.
  • AFN legal team member Mary-Ellen Turpel Lafond has prepared a preliminary comparison table of federal Bill C-15 as compared to Bill C-262 that is attached to this bulletin for your review.

BACKGROUND:

  • In 2007, following more than 25 years of global advocacy by First Nations and other Indigenous peoples, the UN Declaration was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA). Since then, the UNGA has reaffirmed the Declaration several times. Canada is part of numerous consensus resolutions of the UN calling on states to work with Indigenous peoples to develop national action plans and other measures to support implementation, including legislation such as that tabled today.
  • In 2018, Bill C-262 was passed by the House of Commons. Subsequently however, it failed to pass in the Senate of Canada due to a filibuster by a small minority of Senators, preventing it from moving to third reading and passage.
  • Following this, Chiefs-in-Assembly passed Resolution 86/2019. This Resolution called for; a collaborative process to introduce legislation to implement the Declaration as government legislation by the end of 2020; and to ensure such legislation fully respects the Declaration; and establishes the content of Bill C-262 as the floor rather than the ceiling.
  • AFN Executive Committee Motion 2019-12 called for the creation of a Legal Team to engage with the Department of Justice (DoJ) on the federal UN Declaration legislation initiative. This team was led by legal experts, Chief Wilton Littlechild, Mary-Ellen Turpel-Lafond and Paul Joffe.
  • The Speech from the Throne in 2020 committed the government to introduce legislation to implement the UN Declaration by the end of 2020. Canada publicly accepted the content of Bill C-262 as the floor for any government bill and reflected that in a consultative draft. The federal government indicated that the purpose of its engagement was to enhance or strengthen the consultative draft through input from Indigenous peoples.
  • From the end of September into November 2020, DoJ received input, and engaged in dialogue on potential enhancements to the consultative draft from First Nations Rights holders, First Nations Provincial/Territorial organizations and National Indigenous Organizations.
  • The AFN Legal Team focused on ensuring that DoJ was fully cognizant of the status of international law affirming the inherent rights of First Nations under the UN Declaration; as well as the broader body of international law. This includes binding international Treaties affirming the equal right of all peoples to self-determination.
  • The AFN Legal Team engaged in dialogue with DoJ officials to address misinformation and unfounded fears raised by opponents of First Nations rights, as well as speaking to legal issues such as the relationship between the rights of Indigenous peoples under international law and the Constitution of Canada.
  • The AFN Legal Team also identified opportunities to strengthen DoJ’s consultative draft to reflect key developments in international law that uphold and respect First Nations Treaty and inherent rights, title, and jurisdiction.
  • The Crown carries the responsibility to engage with First Nations directly and the AFN is not a replacement for nation-to-nation dialogue to meet Crown legal obligations

CURRENT STATUS:

  • The Minister of Justice introduced Bill C-15 for First Reading today (December 3, 2020).
  • Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond has prepared the attached Comparison Table of Federal Bill C-15 and Bill C-262 with Commentary to assist you in your own review.

NEXT STEPS:

  • The AFN will analyze Bill C-15’s content against Chiefs-in-Assembly Resolutions and will share updates with First Nations.
  • Bill C-15 would need to be advanced to second reading and referral to a Parliamentary Committee for study.

ATTACHMENTS:

  1. Comparison Table of Federal Bill C-15 and Bill C-262 with Commentary (Française to follow)
  2. Bill C-15 (English-Française)

 

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Angie TurnerNational Chief Bulletin: Update on Federal Bill to advance implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples