News

AFN National Chief: Justice Demands Action Now to Show First Nations Lives Matter

on June 27, 2018

June 27, 2018

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde issued the below statement following the not-guilty verdict in the trial of Peter Khill, who was charged with the second-degree murder of John Styres from Oshweken, Ontario.

“The family of Jon Styres is top of mind today. We see once again that Canada has a legal system, but not a justice system. This is the third trial verdict this year that tells First Nations that our lives do not matter, along with 30 years of documented systemic discrimination and racism in the Canadian justice system.  It also sends a troubling signal to Canadians that they will not face consequences for acts of violence they commit on First Nation individuals.

The treatment of First Nations in the justice system stands in stark contrast to other Canadians. First Nations are over-represented in the criminal justice system as offenders, yet their contributions to juries are not sought or welcomed.  Our youth are incarcerated at appalling rates because of unfair treatment by the legal system.  Justice in this country demands action now to address long-standing problems, end discriminative practices, ensure First Nations representation on juries and institute restorative justice. It’s time for all of us to stand up and say ‘First Nations lives matter’.”

 

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada.  Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

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For more information, please contact:

Jenna Young Castro
Communications Officer
613-241-6789, ext. 201
613-314-8157 mobile
[email protected]

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
613-241-6789 ext. 282
613-292-0857 mobile
[email protected]

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Roy WhiteduckAFN National Chief: Justice Demands Action Now to Show First Nations Lives Matter

On First National Indigenous Peoples Day, National Chief Calls for Passing of Bill C-262 as Framework for Reconciliation

on June 21, 2018

(Ottawa, ON) – On the first National Indigenous Peoples Day, Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde urged all members of Parliament and the Senate to pass Bill C-262, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act and ensure it receives Royal Assent in 2018.

“Bill C-262 provides the framework for reconciliation and a path towards closing the gap in the quality of life between First Nations and Canada. On a day focused on celebrating Indigenous peoples across Turtle Island, I urge all members of Parliament and the Senate to move now to ensure it becomes law as quickly as possible,” said AFN National Chief Bellegarde.

Private Member’s Bill C-262, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act, will compel the Government of Canada to: fully implement the UN Declaration; work with First Nations and Indigenous peoples in consultation and cooperation to ensure that the laws of Canada are consistent with the Declaration; work with First Nations and Indigenous peoples to develop a national action plan to achieve the objectives of the Declaration; and report annually to Parliament on progress.

“I encourage First Nations and all Canadians to stand proud today and celebrate the many accomplishments and contributions of First Nations to these lands. The opportunity before all of us now is to move forward together in the true spirit of reconciliation,” said National Chief Bellegarde.

While AFN advocated for the creation of a National Solidarity Day as early as 1982, June 21 has been designated “National Aboriginal Day” since it was announced in 1996 by former Governor General of Canada Roméo LeBlanc. The new name, “National Indigenous Peoples Day”, was announced last June 21 by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, making this year the first day marked with the new name.  The new name is consistent with international recognition and an AFN resolution calling for the change.

The month of June is National Indigenous History Month in Canada.  Through a month-long social media campaign, AFN is encouraging all Canadians to learn more about First Nations contributions, cultures, languages and ceremonies and to take part in events on or around June 21.

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada.  Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

For more information, please contact:

Jenna Young Castro
Communications Officer
613-241-6789, ext. 201
613-314-8157 mobile
[email protected]

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
613-241-6789 ext. 282
613-292-0857 mobile
[email protected]

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Angie TurnerOn First National Indigenous Peoples Day, National Chief Calls for Passing of Bill C-262 as Framework for Reconciliation

Assembly of First Nations Election 2018 Announcement of Candidates for the Office of the National Chief

on June 20, 2018

OTTAWA, ON June 20, 2018 – The Office of the Chief Electoral Officer, responsible for the July election of the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief, has received nomination papers in proper form from the following persons, listed below in alphabetical order by last name: 

  1. Bellegarde, Perry (Incumbent) – SK
  2. Diabo, Russ – QC
  3. North, Sheila – MB
  4. Richardson, Miles – BC
  5. Whitecloud, Katherine – MB

According to the AFN Charter, an Eligible Candidate must:

  • Be eighteen (18) years of age or older;
  • Be of First Nations ancestry;
  • Be a member of a First Nation community, in good standing with the AFN; and
  • Have 15 eligible electors, First Nations Chiefs, endorse their candidacy.

The 2018 Election for the Office of the National Chief will take place on Wednesday, July 25, 2018 during the AFN Annual General Assembly (AGA). The 2018 AGA is taking place at the Vancouver Convention Centre in Vancouver, British Columbia on July 24-26, 2018.

The AFN Charter, Article 22 states that the National Chief shall be elected by a majority of sixty (60) percent of the votes. There are 636 voting members of the Assembly of First Nations. The Assembly of First Nations is the national organization representing First Nation citizens in Canada.

Below is the campaign contact information for each candidate:

Mr. Perry Bellegarde
Media Contact: Jamie Monastyrski
Tel.: 613-612-7229
Email: [email protected]

Mr. Russ Diabo
Campaign Manager: Joanna Anaquod
Email: [email protected]

Ms. Sheila North
Campaign Manager: Jennifer Wood
Tel.: 204-805-2325
Email: [email protected]

Mr. Miles Richardson
Campaign Manager: Rita Kompst
Tel.: 604-734-5906
Email: [email protected]

Ms. Katherine Whitecloud
Email: [email protected]

For more information, please contact:

Loretta J. Pete Lambert,
AFN Chief Electoral Officer: 613-241-6789 ext. 133
or [email protected]

Jessica Quinn,
Assistant to the AFN Chief Electoral Officer: 613-241-6789 ext. 110
or [email protected]

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Sid LeeAssembly of First Nations Election 2018 Announcement of Candidates for the Office of the National Chief

Revitalizing First Nations Languages Demands Urgent Action: AFN National Chief to Meet with Federal, Provincial and Territorial Ministers of Culture and Heritage

on June 18, 2018

(Yellowknife, NWT) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde will meet tomorrow with federal, provincial and territorial ministers responsible for culture and heritage at a roundtable discussion in Yellowknife, NWT. National Chief Bellegarde will urge all governments to work with First Nations on immediate action to revitalize, maintain, preserve and protect First Nations languages, highlighting First Nations-led work to co-develop legislation with Canada.

“Action to revitalize First Nations languages is an urgent priority for reconciliation,” said National Chief Perry Bellegarde. “Language is a right. Language is fundamental to who we are as First Nations peoples. Language is life. We’re working together with First Nations and the federal government on collaborative co-development of federal legislation. The provinces and territories can also work with First Nations to strengthen languages, and it’s encouraging to see this is already happening in some regions. There is a role for every government and every jurisdiction to work with First Nations. Let’s keep moving and maintain momentum as we approach 2019, the International Year of Indigenous Languages.”

The meeting of federal, provincial and territorial ministers and leaders of the Assembly of First Nations, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami and the Métis Nation will take place in Yellowknife June 19 and continues dialogue launched at a ministerial level last August.

“There is a resurgence of First Nations people eager to learn their languages and those who want to revitalize and strengthen our languages,” said National Chief Bellegarde. “Our languages are the original voices of these lands. They are fundamental to who we are as peoples and as nations. Our language rights are protected as inherent, constitutional and human rights. I look forward to continuing our collaborative efforts to ensure First Nations languages are spoken in this land by the coming generations.”

National Chief Bellegarde will advocate action by all levels of government to support First Nations priorities and jurisdictional authority, including committing sustained, long-term investments that would foster fluency and regular use of First Nations languages within our homes, educational institutions and operations of First Nations governments and in federal and provincial government services.

The AFN has been working together with the Department of Canadian Heritage, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami and the Métis Nation, to co-develop Indigenous languages legislation that is ‘distinction-based’, reflective of the different needs of First Nations, Inuit and Métis. Legislation is expected to be tabled Fall 2018. Prime Minister Trudeau announced his commitment to co-developing an Indigenous Languages Act at the AFN’s Special Chiefs Assembly in December 2016 which reflects the Assembly of First Nations 2015 Closing the Gap policy advocacy document.

A 2017 Nanos poll indicates that 74% of Canadians support the creation of an Indigenous Languages Act to ensure the protection, preservation, revitalization and maintenance of Indigenous languages in Canada.

There are more than 58 distinct Indigenous languages and more than 90 distinct languages and dialects spoken in Canada. There are no First Nations languages considered to be safe.

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.



For more information, please contact:

Jenna Young Castro
AFN Communications Officer
613-241-6789 ext 201
613-314-8157 (cell)
[email protected]

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 382
613-292-0857
[email protected]

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Sid LeeRevitalizing First Nations Languages Demands Urgent Action: AFN National Chief to Meet with Federal, Provincial and Territorial Ministers of Culture and Heritage

AFN TECHNICAL BULLETIN – Chronic Wasting Disease

on June 17, 2018

CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE UPDATE

The Assembly of First Nations (AFN) is providing this Bulletin to all First Nations to share some important information on an environmental health issue that is affecting, deer, elk, moose, caribou, and potentially humans. Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) is a fatal neurological disease that affects species in the deer family (cervids). Neurological disorders are diseases of the brain, spine and the nerves that connect them.  In an effort to create awareness for First Nations, AFN will be developing communication materials to educate First Nations communities about CWD. Some quick facts on CWD are included on the next page of this Bulletin.

New scientific evidence suggests that CWD transmission to humans may be possible. To date however, there have been no reported human cases of CWD and further studies are being done to better understand potential risks. As the risk to humans is not yet fully understood, it is recommended that all animals harvested in areas where infection is known to occur be tested prior to consumption, and that any tissue from an infected animal not be used or consumed by humans.

CWD has spread north from the United States into Canada. Cases are currently contained to the provinces of Saskatchewan and Alberta, where testing is mandatory in certain areas. Voluntary testing is available in Ontario, Quebec, Manitoba, British Columbia, and Yukon. Information about CWD testing in each region is available through provincial and territorial government websites.

Many First Nations communities rely on hunting for food, social, and ceremonial use. This puts First Nations at increased risk of exposure to CWD. The AFN is working towards developing better resources to inform First Nations and raise awareness about CWD to assist in avoiding any potential risk, and to ensure First Nations are included in ongoing efforts to address this issue.

The AFN is mandated to engage in this work through Resolution 70/2010, First Nation-controlled Awareness, Training & Surveillance Program for Chronic Wasting Disease and Resolution 13/2017, Chronic Wasting Disease. As set out in these resolutions, the AFN will continue to work with concerned First Nations, organizations, and governments to develop and strengthen First Nation wildlife and human health programs, including those dealing with Chronic Wasting Disease.

AFN will provide more information on CWD as it is available.  For more information on CWD please contact:

Benjamin Green-Stacey, [email protected]

Or

Judith Eigenbrod, [email protected]


 

Quick Facts on Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD):

  • Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal nervous system disease known to infect white-tailed deer, mule deer, black-tailed deer, moose,  elk, and caribou.
  • It is recommended that all harvested animals be submitted for testing before consumption, and that any tissue that may have come from a CWD-infected animal not be used or consumed by humans.
  • Animals with CWD may show a number of different symptoms as the disease slowly damages their brain. These include: excessive thirst, salivation and urination, lack of coordination, paralysis, separation from the other animals in the herd and, weight loss.
  • CWD was first detected in Canada on a Saskatchewan elk farm in 1996. Since then the disease has spread across Saskatchewan and Alberta.
  • CWD is transmitted directly through contact between infected animals and indirectly through contact with contaminated surfaces and soil in the environment. CWD is confirmed by testing tissue from the affected animal after it is dead.
  • No treatment is available for animals affected with CWD. No vaccine is available to prevent CWD infection in wildlife or humans.
  • Currently CWD is a reportable disease under the Health of Animals Act and all cases must be reported to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, resulting in immediate investigation.
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rdbrinkhurstAFN TECHNICAL BULLETIN – Chronic Wasting Disease

AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde Congratulates New AFN Yukon Regional Chief Kluane Adamek

on June 12, 2018

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde congratulates Kluane Adamek who was elected by acclamation as the AFN Yukon Regional Chief Thursday.

“I have spoken with Regional Chief Adamek to offer my congratulations on this strong show of support from First Nations in her region,” said AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde. “Regional Chief Adamek is a tireless advocate for the priorities of Yukon First Nations at the national level and her contributions inform all work on the AFN Executive Committee. I welcome her and look forward to her continued efforts and leadership in priority areas, including the environment, economic development, education, child and youth development and governance.”

Regional Chief Adamek has served as Interim Regional Chief for the Yukon since January 2018. As Interim Regional Chief, Adamek brought together Yukon First Nations leaders for three summits focused on setting accountability, structure and priorities for the AFN Yukon Region. Yukon First Nation leadership approved key documents at these meetings. Through an increased social media presence, a new website and regular information bulletins, the AFN Yukon Regional Office is strengthening vital communication and coordination across the region.

“I am deeply humbled to be named Regional Chief Elect. I am committed to working with our leaders, communities, Elders and youth to champion our causes and strengthen our voices at the national level,” said Regional Chief Adamek, who is honoured to continue supporting all Yukon First Nations over the next three years. “We came together to build on the work of our former leaders. I’m proud of all that we’ve accomplished during these last few months. We’ve strengthened the regional office and continue to support all Yukon First Nations at their direction. I am committed to advancing this work so together, we can make a difference, continue to press for fairness and equity, and ensure our priorities are reflected nationally.”

Regional Chief Adamek is a proud citizen of Kluane First Nation. She will be sworn in as AFN Yukon Regional Chief on June 28, 2018 at the first AFN Yukon First Nations Annual Summit being held on Na-Cho Nyak Dun Traditional Territory.

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

For media requests or more information, please contact:

Jamie Monastyrski
Press Secretary – National Chief’s Office
613-241-6789 ext 116
343-540-6179 (cell)
[email protected]

Jenna Young Castro
AFN Communications Officer
613-241-6789 ext 201
613-314-8157 (cell)
[email protected]

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 382
613-292-0857
[email protected]

read more
Roy WhiteduckAFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde Congratulates New AFN Yukon Regional Chief Kluane Adamek

AFN Renews Call for Families First Approach as National Inquiry Receives Extended Mandate

on June 7, 2018

June 5, 2018

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde and Chief Denise Stonefish, Chair of the AFN Women’s Council, said today the extension of the National Inquiry on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls creates an opportunity to refocus its work in ways that will ensure survivors and families are at the forefront.

“The National Inquiry must allow survivors of violence and families of victims to inform its work through their experiences and sharing of their recommendations,” said AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde.  “As I’ve said from day one of this Inquiry, we must not wait for the outcome of the Inquiry to provide safety and security to all families at risk.  The announcements today of resources for health and investigative supports are important and welcomed as part of ongoing, sustained efforts to end violence against Indigenous women and girls.”

Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Carolyn Bennett today announced the federal government will extend the National Inquiry on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls until April 30, 2019, providing an additional two months to June 30, 2019 to end operations.  The final report and recommendations are now expected April 30, 2019.  The government also announced new funds and resources for health supports, law enforcement and commemorative activities.

The AFN has a national resolution supporting an extension provided the National Inquiry takes a families first approach.

“The National Inquiry needs to organize its work in these final months in a way that effectively engages survivors and families,” said Chief Denise Stonefish, Chair of the Assembly of First Nations Women’s Council.  “’Families first’ means survivors and families are actively engaged every step of the way, that outreach to them is improved and their input is respected.  The federal government must ensure families and survivors are involved in the implementation of health supports and services.  And these health supports and services must be ongoing until the recommendations of the final report are implemented. This is the only way to achieve results that will ensure safety and security for Indigenous women and girls.”

Minister Bennett today also announced the Government of Canada’s response to recommendations by the National Inquiry released in an interim report in November 2017.  This includes $21.3 million for health support services to survivors of violence and for the families of victims.  Health supports will extend to June 20, 2020.

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada.  Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

 

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For more information, please contact:

Jamie Monastyrski
Press Secretary – National Chief’s Office
Assembly of First Nations
343-540-6179 (cell)
[email protected]

Jenna Young Castro
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 201
613-314-8157 (cell)
[email protected]

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 382
613-292-0857
[email protected]

read more
Roy WhiteduckAFN Renews Call for Families First Approach as National Inquiry Receives Extended Mandate

On Third Anniversary of Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action, Assembly of First Nations Urges Governments and All Canadians to Commit to Progress and Results

on June 1, 2018

June 1, 2018 

(Ottawa, ON) – In advance of the third anniversary of the release of 94 Calls to Action by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde today called for action and results from governments and Canadians.

“We all have a role in reconciliation – governments, institutions, First Nations and every Canadian,” said AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde.  “We need to see urgent and sustained action by all levels of government to work with First Nations to give life to the TRC’s Calls to Acton. Canadians need to know that their actions, big and small, will help drive change.  Learn more about our shared history and read the Calls to Action. Then find a way to contribute to reconciliation and help close the gap in the quality of life between First Nations and Canada.”

On June 2, 2015 the TRC released 94 Calls to Action on priorities aimed at reconciliation, including child welfare, justice, education and health. The full report was released December 15, 2015. The findings followed six years of testimony from more than 7,000 former residential school students across Canada, and experts and others connected to the residential schools.

To help commemorate the third anniversary of the TRC Calls to Action, and to raise awareness of National Indigenous History month, the AFN is encouraging Canadians to educate themselves and to take concrete action in support of reconciliation.  Acts of reconciliation can include writing Senators to support Bill C-262 (a bill to enact the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples).  The first principle in the TRC’s Calls to Action states that the UN Declaration is “the framework for reconciliation at all levels and across all sectors of Canadian society”.

Canadians can take other actions to help advance understanding, awareness and reconciliation, such as participating in the KAIROS Blanket Exercise (available online and iTunes via the AFN Education Toolkit), visiting an Indigenous Friendship Centre, taking part in ceremonies or listening to Elders and Wisdom Keepers, attending National Indigenous Peoples Day events (marked on June 21, with events continuing through the weekend in many places) and reading books, essays and publications or viewing films or series about the shared history of Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in Canada.

The AFN is currently working with Indigenous Watchdog to analyze the federal government’s progress on implementing the 94 Calls to Action, and continues to encourage direct engagement with First Nations to fulfil this work.  The advocacy and policy work of the AFN is closely aligned with the Calls to Action, including efforts and progress in the areas of First Nations education, languages, child welfare and health.

 

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada.  Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

 

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For more information, please contact:

Jamie Monastyrski
Press Secretary – National Chief’s Office
613-241-6789 ext. 116
343-540-6179 mobile
[email protected]

Jenna Young Castro
Communications Officer
613-241-6789, ext 201
613-314-8157 mobile
[email protected]

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
613-241-6789 ext. 282
613-292-0857 mobile
[email protected]

read more
Roy WhiteduckOn Third Anniversary of Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action, Assembly of First Nations Urges Governments and All Canadians to Commit to Progress and Results

National Chief Welcomes Passing on Third Reading in Parliament of United Nations Declaration Bill

on May 30, 2018

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde welcomed the passing on third reading of Private Member’s Bill C-262, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act, in the House of Commons today. The bill will now go to the Senate, taking another significant step closer to becoming Canadian law.

“The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is the framework for reconciliation and closing the gap in the quality of life between First Nations and Canada,” said AFN National Chief Bellegarde. “It affirms the Treaty and inherent rights and title of First Nations. It is now ten years since the Declaration was adopted by the UN General Assembly and time for Canada to make this important commitment to move on its implementation in full partnership with First Nations. I commend all those who voted today in support of this bill. In particular, I lift up NDP MP Romeo Saganash for working so hard with his colleagues, with First Nations and Canadians across the country to advance this Bill.

I urge Members of the Senate to deal expeditiously with this Bill and look forward to the historic day, now closer than ever, when it is given Royal Assent. That will move all of us forward and create a more fair and just country.”

 

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada.  Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

For more information, please contact:

Jamie Monastyrski
Press Secretary – National Chief’s Office
613-241-6789 ext. 116
343-540-6179 mobile
[email protected]

Jenna Young Castro
Communications Officer
613-241-6789, ext. 201
613-314-8157 mobile
[email protected]

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
613-241-6789 ext. 282
613-292-0857 mobile
[email protected]

read more
Roy WhiteduckNational Chief Welcomes Passing on Third Reading in Parliament of United Nations Declaration Bill

Auditor General Report Shows Need for Government to Make Better Use of Data, Work with First Nations to Make Faster Progress on Closing the Gap

on May 30, 2018

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde today responded to the Auditor General of Canada’s report, calling on Canada to change its approach and make better use of data it is collecting to make more informed decisions to close the gap in the quality of life between First Nations people and Canada more quickly.

“Canada is requiring data and then not using it effectively to improve the lives of First Nations people,” said AFN National Chief Bellegarde. “The Auditor General’s report shows clearly the need for the federal government to engage directly with First Nations to share more information and get better decisions and better results. This has been a long-standing issue and one First Nations and the Auditor General have raised repeatedly over the years. We fully support the recommendations that the government engage directly with First Nations so we achieve better results for First Nations, and a stronger Canada.”

The report released today by the Office of the Auditor General of Canada included two chapters specific to First Nation and Indigenous peoples. Socio-economic Gaps on First Nations Reserves examines Indigenous Services Canada (ISC) with a focus on First Nations high school graduation rates on-reserve. The chapter states that ISC did not satisfactorily measure or report on Canada’s progress in closing the socio-economic gaps between on-reserve First Nations and other Canadians and that the Department’s use of data to improve education programs was inadequate. The report indicates that the education gap is actually growing, and that on-reserve high school graduation rates may be closer to 1 in 4 than the government’s reporting of 1 in 2.

The report includes an audit focused on programming by Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) aimed at increasing Indigenous employment. The report concludes that ESDC’s management of the programs was not sufficient to demonstrate that these programs achieved their goals. Collecting adequate data and defining performance indicators would allow ESDC to determine whether the programs are leading to meaningful and sustainable employment and whether changes are needed.

“It is essential that all investments and resources directed towards First Nations are reaching the people in need and having a positive impact,” said AFN National Chief Bellegarde. “It is simply unacceptable that the situation described by the Auditor General has been allowed to continue. We need to fix this broken approach, now. First Nations know what’s needed, what’s working and what isn’t, better than anyone because they are working directly with our people. This report reinforces our goals of First Nations control of First Nations education and the need for a distinct First Nations labour market strategy directed by First Nations.”

The report of the Auditor General sets out a number of recommendations for change that include engaging with First Nations and Indigenous peoples on decision-making and getting better, more accurate information. The National Chief noted this could include working towards a First Nations statistical institute.

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates

For more information, please contact:

Jamie Monastyrski
Press Secretary – National Chief’s Office
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 222
343-540-6179 (cell)
[email protected]

Jenna Young Castro
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext 201
613-314-8157 (cell)
[email protected]

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
613-241-6789 ext. 282
613-292-0857 mobile
[email protected]

read more
Sid LeeAuditor General Report Shows Need for Government to Make Better Use of Data, Work with First Nations to Make Faster Progress on Closing the Gap
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