News

Government of Canada and Assembly of First Nations announce new policy and funding approach for First Nations K-12 education on reserve

on January 21, 2019

News Release
For Immediate Release

January, 21, 2019 – Unceded Algonquin Territory, Ottawa, ON, Indigenous Services Canada

New approach takes effect April 1, 2019, supports First Nations control of First Nations education, and ensures more predictable and sufficient funding. 

First Nations students on-reserve deserve a high quality education with financial investments that meet their unique needs, including supports for language and culture to ensure they get the best start in life.

Today, the Honourable Seamus O’Regan, Minister of Indigenous Services, and National Chief Perry Bellegarde of the Assembly of First Nations (AFN), announced a new co-developed policy and improved funding approach that will better support the needs of First Nations students on-reserve.

As of April 1, 2019, the new funding approach will:

  • replace outdated proposal-based programs with improved access to predictable core funding;
  • ensure base funding is comparable to provincial systems across the country while working towards additional funding agreements based on need to better account for factors such as remoteness, school size, language, and socio-economic conditions;
  • provide First Nations schools with $1,500 per student, per year, to support language and culture programming;
  • provide new resources which will support full-time kindergarten in every First Nations school for children aged four and five; and
  • ensure special education funding is more predictable, with fewer application-based requirements.

Following extensive engagements in 2016 and 2017, this new co-developed funding approach to K-12 education responds to First Nations advocacy to better meet the needs of students, improve education outcomes and strengthen First Nations control of First Nations education.

Indigenous Services Canada is currently working with First Nations across the country to implement the new formula-based regional funding models, and will be publishing more detailed information on the Government of Canada’s website in the coming months.

Ultimately, this new approach is an important step toward the creation of new Treaty-based, regional and/or local education agreements that put First Nations in control of First Nations education, and will better meet the needs of students.

Quotes 

“Every First Nations child deserves the best start in life with a high quality and culturally relevant education that meets their needs. Today’s announcement of a new, co-developed policy and funding approach for on-reserve education replaces an outdated system and ensures predictability. This new approach will allow First Nations to be in the driver’s seat – ensuring that they are in control of First Nations education.”

The Honourable Seamus O’Regan, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Indigenous Services


“Today we are another step closer to the long-standing goal of First Nations control of First Nations education. This new approach means First Nations have the ability to implement their own models of education. It means a shift from proposal-based funding toward predictable and sustained funding so First Nations can plan and build quality education systems that reflect their needs and their vision of holistic, lifelong learning.  This is a significant step toward closing the gap in education outcomes for First Nations children and students.” 

National Chief Perry Bellegarde
Assembly of First Nations


“Lifelong learning and a greater quality of life starts with quality education. This new approach is an important step toward First Nations taking greater control of planning and delivering education based on real need. Fair and sustained funding for First Nations children and students, including languages and cultures, will lead to better outcomes for everyone. This is a strong step, but there is a lot more to do to create equity in First Nations education and communities. As the largest growing demographic in the country, investing in First Nations students and young people is investing in Canada’s future.”

Ontario Regional Chief RoseAnne Archibald
Assembly of First Nations, Portfolio Lead on Education


Quick Facts

  • Budget 2016 included an additional $2.6 billion over five years for elementary and secondary education. Since then, total funding for education on-reserve has increased by more than 30%, and will continue to increase through 2020-2021.
  • The new formula-based core funding model for elementary and secondary education will be data-driven and responsive to student population growth and education cost pressures.
  • The new formula-based funding methodology will be more understandable for recipients and informed by ongoing technical discussions.
  • With the new approach, two proposal-based funding streams, representing $360 million, will be rolled into core funding, reducing the administrative burden.

Related Products

Backgrounder – New Funding and Policy Approach for First Nations Kindergarten to Grade 12 Education

 

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For more information, media may contact:

Rachel Rappaport
Press Secretary
Office of the Honourable Seamus O’Regan
Minister of Indigenous Services
819-934-2796

Media Relations
Indigenous Services Canada
819-953-1160

Jenna Young Castro
Senior Communications Advisor
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 201
613-314-8157 mobile
[email protected]

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Roy WhiteduckGovernment of Canada and Assembly of First Nations announce new policy and funding approach for First Nations K-12 education on reserve

AFN Congratulates the Teslin Tlingit Council in Recent Yukon Supreme Court Ruling Confirming Canada’s Legal Obligations to Modern Treaties

on January 21, 2019

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde and AFN Yukon Regional Chief Kluane Adamek congratulate the Teslin Tlingit Council (TTC) on the recent Yukon Supreme Court decision that affirms Canada’s constitutional obligation to meaningfully and appropriately implement the terms of Modern Treaties, particularly the TTC Final and Self-Government Agreement.

“Self-government agreements have the potential to create a modern, effective relationship between First Nations and Canada, but Canada has to fulfill its promises once the agreements are made,” said AFN National Chief Bellegarde. “Otherwise, First Nations will not sign these documents. TTC signed their Final and Self-Government agreements on the understanding that their self-governing authority would be supported with fair funding from Canada. That isn’t happening and Canada is eroding its credibility. I lift up TTC for fighting for their people and their rights.”

Yukon Supreme Court Justice Ron Veale found that Canada has failed its obligations to the TTC Self-Government agreements by not providing funding for all its citizens. The court found that Canada has only been funding TTC and other Yukon First Nations on the number of “status” citizens. However, TTC’s self-government agreement does distinguish between citizens that hold Indian status and those that don’t.

For several years, TTC has noted the importance of properly funding all their citizens, according to the terms of their self-government agreements. Regional Chief Adamek says the court decision reaffirms TTC’s view and interpretation of their agreements.

“Justice Vaele’s decision sets a positive precedent and important recognition that Modern Treaties, particularly TTC’s self-government agreement, are paramount to federal policies. This ruling signals to Canada that meaningful realization of self-government requires the federal government to uphold its constitutional obligations to the terms of Final and Self-Government Agreements. Federal officials cannot continue to interpret our agreements through the lens of the Indian Act,” the Regional Chief said.

“Yukon First Nation children and families deserve proper programs and services supported by adequate funding based on the total population of citizens as determined by each respective First Nation. TTC, and other Yukon First Nations, entered into modern treaties, after decades of negotiation, to reach an agreement that would enable Canada and TTC to further their common priorities. At its core, the agreement is about ensuring Teslin Tlingit citizens, regardless of federally-imposed categories of status or non-status, can realize self-determinations in accordance with their principles and values.”

TTC signed their Final Land Claims and Self-Government Agreement in 1995, in good faith. Their preference, as has been their history, is to negotiate with governments to realize their interests. TTC is disappointed they had to turn to the courts to confirm what they’ve consistently stated since 2010. However, they see this decision as a turning point to get on with the work of finalizing a financial transfer agreement with Canada that will provide resources to meaningfully support the needs of their citizens.

The Assembly of First Nations is the national organization representing First Nation citizens in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Comms, @AFN_Updates.

 

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For more information, please contact:

Michael Hutchinson
Press Secretary for the National Chief
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 244
613-859-6831 (cell)
[email protected]

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 382
613-292-0857 (mobile)
[email protected]

Arturo Calvo
A/Communications and Policy Analyst
Assembly of First Nations Yukon Region
867-393-920 ext. 9227
867-334-3314 (cell)
[email protected]

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Roy WhiteduckAFN Congratulates the Teslin Tlingit Council in Recent Yukon Supreme Court Ruling Confirming Canada’s Legal Obligations to Modern Treaties

First Nations Priorities Must Be Canada’s Priorities – AFN National Chief Responds to Federal Cabinet Shuffle

on January 14, 2019

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde responded to today’s federal cabinet shuffle stating continued commitment and progress on First Nations priorities is critical to moving forward and closing the gap between First Nations and the rest of Canada.

“Cabinet positions will change, but First Nations peoples and issues must remain a top priority,” said AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde. “We will work to ensure the entire cabinet understands that the First Nations agenda is Canada’s agenda. Progress moves us all forward. We’ll be delivering this message to the Prime Minister and his cabinet at our meeting today on First Nations priorities.”

National Chief Bellegarde and AFN Regional Chiefs are meeting with the Prime Minister and senior cabinet ministers this afternoon consistent with commitments under the AFN-Canada Memorandum of Understanding on Joint Priorities. The meeting was scheduled prior to the announcement of today’s cabinet shuffle.

National Chief Bellegarde noted some changes to key portfolios dealing with the First Nations agenda.

“I look forward to meeting with the new Minister of Indigenous Services Seamus O’Regan and the new Attorney General David Lametti as soon as possible,” said National Chief Bellegarde. “We lift up the work of former Attorney General Jody Wilson-Raybould as the first Indigenous Justice Minister and her efforts to bring a First Nations perspective to Canada’s legal system. I look forward to our continued work together in her new role as Minister of Veterans Affairs. Justice for First Nations veterans has been a long-standing priority for me and for the AFN. I’m honoured to have worked with the new Treasury Board President Jane Philpott and acknowledge all her efforts as Minister of Indigenous Services. Her openness and commitment to working together is a positive example for all governments.”

The Assembly of First Nations is the national organization representing First Nation citizens in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Comms, @AFN_Updates.

For more information, please contact:

Jenna Young Castro
Senior Communications Advisor
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext 201
613-314-8157 (cell)
[email protected]

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 382
613-292-0857
[email protected]

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Sid LeeFirst Nations Priorities Must Be Canada’s Priorities – AFN National Chief Responds to Federal Cabinet Shuffle

Reconciliation Will Not Be Achieved Through Force

on January 8, 2019

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde issued the following statement today on the RCMP’s action against the Gidimt’en camp and checkpoint yesterday in northern B.C., set up in support of the Unist’ot’en, both of which are houses of the Wet’suwet’en Nation:

“This use of force against peaceful people is a violation of human rights and First Nations’ rights. Building consensus under duress will make the resolution of the situation in Northern British Columbia very difficult. Real consensus will be built when the parties, with very different views, come together in meaningful and productive dialogue. And I am confident that they can do this.

Canada and the B.C. government have both pledged to implement the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, but are trying to impose their laws over Wet’suwet’en laws. If this was really about the ‘rule of law’ then governments would be honouring the rights and title of First Nations in their traditional territories, which are recognized by Canada’s own courts. The AFN supports the governance and decision-making process of the Wet’suwet’en leaders. Canada and B.C. should do the same. There is no reconciliation in the actions that unfolded yesterday.”

National Chief Bellegarde has been in contact with the BC AFN office and AFN BC Regional Chief Terry Teegee to stay fully informed of all developments. Reports indicate 14 people were arrested during the RCMP action

The Assembly of First Nations is the national organization representing First Nation citizens in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Comms, @AFN_Updates.

For more information, please contact:
Michael Hutchinson
Press Secretary for the National Chief
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 244
613-859-6831 (cell)
[email protected]

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Sid LeeReconciliation Will Not Be Achieved Through Force

National Chief Perry Bellegarde Bulletin December 2018

on December 21, 2018

AFN Special Chiefs Assembly

The Assembly of First Nations issues regular updates on work underway at the national office.
More information is available at www.afn.ca.

SUMMARY:

• The Assembly of First Nations (AFN) held its Special Chiefs Assembly from December 4 – 6, 2018, on unceded Algonquin territory in Ottawa, Ontario. Fifty-two resolutions were passed and will be posted on the AFN website very soon.
• The AFN participated in the First Ministers Meeting focused on trade and the economy on December 10, 2018, and brought a strong message on the need for First Nations involvement in this work and full respect for First Nations rights.

AFN Special Chiefs Assembly, December 4-6, 2018

Over 1,700 Chiefs, Elders, youth and other delegates attended the AFN Special Chiefs Assembly (SCA) from December 4 – 6 on unceded Algonquin territory in Ottawa, Ontario. The theme was “Acknowledging our Challenges, Successes and Opportunities”, and it was a chance to assess progress, set priorities, and strategic direction for the coming year.

We began by acknowledging the absence of long-serving AFN Elder Elmer Courchene, of the Sagkeeng Anicinabe First Nation, who could not join us due to illness. On day one of the Assembly, a chair and blanket were placed with the Elders to honour him and remind us of his presence. We were all shocked and saddened to learn the next day of his passing, so we held a special ceremony. During the SCA, we also acknowledged the passing of Chief St Denis, who was Chief of the Wolf Lake First Nation for over 30 years, and the late Wendall Nicholas, who had worked with the AFN Elders. The Chiefs also honoured Veteran Louis Levi Oakes, the last surviving Mohawk code talker, with a blanket ceremony.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau addressed the Chiefs-in-Assembly on the first day. This is the fourth time he has been to our Assemblies since his election. Prime Minister Trudeau pledged to continue working with Indigenous peoples. He anticipates passing Indigenous child welfare legislation and an Indigenous Languages Act before the House of Commons rises in June 2019. Several Cabinet Ministers addressed the SCA, including Minister Hajdu, Minister Bennett and Minister Philpott. Conservative Party leader Andrew Scheer, NDP leader Jagmeet Singh, and Green Party leader Elizabeth May all addressed the delegates and took questions.

The Chiefs passed 52 resolutions at the SCA. These resolutions provide the mandate for the work of the AFN. All are important, but I can highlight some that deal with new issues. As you may know, 2019 is the United Nations International Year of Indigenous Languages, and one resolution calls on the AFN and the federal government to propose, advocate and support the United Nations in declaring an international decade of Indigenous languages. There were three resolutions on First Nations child welfare, including support for co-development of legislation with the federal government – supporting First Nations rights and jurisdiction in this critical area. A resolution was passed calling for a national heritage strategy to commemorate all Residential School sites based on First Nations’ direction. There were resolutions approving the National Housing and Related Infrastructure Strategy and research in this area, and a resolution mandating an AFN modern treaty implementation group.

One resolution I want to highlight is the resolution on the “Rejection of the Recognition and Implementation of Indigenous Rights Framework and Associated Processes.” This builds on previous AFN resolutions affirming the position that only First Nations can determine their path out of decolonization and First Nations must direct their own approaches to Nation rebuilding. We heard some inspiring words by youth from the Association of Iroquois and Allied Indians, who held a rally on Day 1 and spoke to the Assembly about rights, title and jurisdiction.

There is much more detail available on all of the resolutions passed at the December SCA. The resolutions will be posted shortly on the AFN website along with the SCA 2018 report. A full webcast of the SCA is also available at www.afn.ca

First Ministers Meeting

On December 10, 2018, the day after the SCA, I attended the First Ministers Meeting focused on trade and the economy in Montreal with Quebec Regional Chief Ghislain Picard, BC Regional Chief Terry Teegee, Northwest Territories Regional Chief Norman Yakeleya and Federation of Saskatchewan Indigenous Nations Vice-Chief Morley Watson. The meeting, called by the Prime Minister, included all provincial and territorial leaders.

The AFN stated clearly that attempts to deny or ignore the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the lack of recognition of free, prior and informed consent are barriers to trade and development. We reminded the First Ministers that the enormous wealth of this country is primarily generated from First Nations lands. Any decision-making processes for natural resource development projects must involve First Nations from the very outset.

We told the Prime Minister and Premiers that permits and licenses should not be given out by governments until companies can prove that they have developed a positive relationship with the local First Nations, a strategy for First Nations engagement, and opportunities for procurement, employment and revenue sharing.

I outlined a number of ways the First Ministers can improve opportunities for First Nations, including recruiting and retaining First Nations as part of advisory councils, corporate boards, and any decision-making bodies; finding more ways to share in revenue and ownership; consideration of legislation that would require a percentage of procurement be set aside for First Nations businesses and service providers; and improving access to equity.

Happy Holidays!

The AFN wants to thank all of you for your involvement, engagement and direction over the past year. I look forward to our ongoing work in 2019 – the International Year of Indigenous Languages! We offer our best wishes to you for a safe and happy holiday season.

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Angie TurnerNational Chief Perry Bellegarde Bulletin December 2018

Failed leadership by Thunder Bay Police Board Contributes to Systemic Racism within Thunder Bay Police Service

on December 17, 2018

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde released the below statement in response to the report made public today by Senator Murray Sinclair on the Thunder Bay Police Services Board (TBPSB).

“Senator Sinclair’s report further confirms systemic racism in the Thunder Bay police force and underscores the urgent need for transformative change in policing in Thunder Bay. The Board has failed to recognize and address the violence and systemic racism against Indigenous people in Thunder Bay,” said AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde. “Today’s report explains, the Board failed in its duty to lead and create engagement that would resolve the issues within the Thunder Bay Police Service. It was clearly the responsibility of the TBPSB to identify critical issues, provide leadership to resolve concerns, and develop and plan concrete action focused on respect and building trust. We need to see police valuing the lives of our people and a refocus toward service, safety and protection. Any effort to implement recommendations and change should be done collaboratively with First Nations experts and rebuilding a relationship that has been strained for far too long.”

Senator Murray Sinclair was appointed by the Ontario Civilian Police Commission (OCPC) in July 2017 to investigate the Thunder Bay Police Services Board. Among 32 recommendations to address systemic racism, the report calls for the board to be dismantled for one year, with oversight replaced by an administrator. The report comes days after the Office of the Independent Police Review Director confirmed systemic racism within the Thunder Bay Police Services and that city police devalue the lives of First Nation people.

The OCPC investigation was conducted in response to concerns raised by First Nations leaders from Nishnawbe Aski Nation, Grand Council Treaty 3 and the Rainy River First Nation regarding the Thunder Bay Police Services Board’s oversight of police services following a series of deaths and race-based violence against Indigenous peoples in Thunder Bay. The OCPC is an arms-length agency of the Ontario government.

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

For media requests or more information, please contact:

Jenna Young Castro
AFN Senior Communications Advisor
613-241-6789 ext. 201
613-314-8157 mobile
[email protected]

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 382
613-292-0857 mobile
[email protected]

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Sid LeeFailed leadership by Thunder Bay Police Board Contributes to Systemic Racism within Thunder Bay Police Service

Ending Violence Against First Nations Women and Girls Can’t Wait: AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde

on December 14, 2018

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde commented today on the conclusion of the truth gathering process of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.

“I lift up the family members, survivors and all those who shared their experiences and put forward recommendations to the Commissioners of the National Inquiry,” said AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde. “Their bravery and the memory of their loved ones must be honoured by the National Inquiry through a final report that contains concrete recommendations aimed at addressing root causes and systemic problems. As I have said in the past, we cannot wait for the final report to take action to ensure First Nations women and girls are safe and secure in their homes and communities. We know there are things we can do right now to protect them and support them. This Inquiry has had its difficulties and it is important to always remember that the families come first. That principle must guide the writing of the final report. The AFN continues to stand with survivors and families in their journey to healing.”

The National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls concludes its truth gathering process with submissions by Parties with Standing in Ottawa this week. The AFN made its submission in Calgary last month. The Commissioners will now work on the final report and recommendations, expected to be submitted to the Government of Canada in April 2019.

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

For media requests or more information, please contact:

Jenna Young Castro
AFN Senior Communications Advisor
613-241-6789 ext. 201
613-314-8157 mobile
[email protected]

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 382
613-292-0857 mobile
[email protected]

read more
Sid LeeEnding Violence Against First Nations Women and Girls Can’t Wait: AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde

Action Required to Address Failings of Thunder Bay Police Service: National Chief Perry Bellegarde

on December 12, 2018

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde said today’s report by the Office of the Independent Police Review Director on the relationship between the Thunder Bay Police Service (TBPS) and First Nations compels immediate action on long-standing and well-known concerns.

“This report is as tragic as it is unsurprising, and it reinforces what First Nations have been saying for years – systemic racism is clearly something that needs to be addressed in a profound and substantial manner,” said AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde. “This report helps set direction for immediate action. Obviously, current approaches to investigating the deaths and disappearances of First Nations fail all of us, erode trust and exacerbate already strained relationships. Sadly, we’re talking about the death of children in too many instances. I lift up the family of Stacy DeBungee and the leadership of the Rainy River First Nation for pushing this review. The Thunder Bay Police Service must work with First Nations to take action on the recommendations. This includes rebuilding a relationship with First Nations peoples and leadership based on respect and trust.”

The report “Broken Trust: Indigenous People and the Thunder Bay Police Service” released this morning in Thunder Bay found “significant deficiencies” in sudden death investigations involving Indigenous people “due, in part, to racial stereotyping” and that systemic racism exists at an institutional level.

“Sadly, most of the processes looking at how justice is being delivered when it comes to our peoples have fallen short on making the changes needed,” said AFN Regional Chief Ghislain Picard, who is the AFN lead on justice and policing. “Much of it relates to a lack of trust and the belief that indigenous peoples will not be treated with dignity when confronted with non-Indigenous police services.”

First Nation citizens and leaders in Thunder Bay and the surrounding region have long expressed concerns about the treatment of First Nations by city police. The review was triggered by the death of Rainy River First Nation member Stacy DeBungee in October 2015.

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

For media requests or more information, please contact:

Jenna Young Castro
AFN Senior Communications Advisor
613-241-6789 ext. 201
613-314-8157 mobile
[email protected]

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 382
613-292-0857 mobile
[email protected]

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Sid LeeAction Required to Address Failings of Thunder Bay Police Service: National Chief Perry Bellegarde

AFN National Chief Delivers Strong Message to First Ministers About First Nations Rights in Economic Decision Making

on December 10, 2018

(Montreal, QC): Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde told the Prime Minister and Premiers at the First Ministers Meeting today that permits and licenses should not be given out by governments until companies can prove that they have developed a relationship with the local First Nations, a strategy for First Nations engagement, and opportunities for procurement, employment and revenue sharing.

The National Chief stated that attempts to deny or ignore the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the lack of recognition of free, prior and informed consent are barriers to trade and development.

“The enormous wealth generated in this country from resource development is primarily generated from First Nations lands. And trade in resources and goods began with us, First Nations peoples. Today, our economic interests – as federal, provincial and territorial governments and as First Nations governments – are interdependent,” the National Chief said. “Where First Nations’ rights are not respected, resource development is delayed and costs go up. This uncertainty makes investors wary. Decision making processes for natural resource development projects must involve First Nations from the very initial stages of planning and exploration through to licensing, implementation and close out.”

The National Chief attended the meeting in Montreal with Quebec Regional Chief Ghislain Picard, BC Regional Chief Terry Teegee, Northwest Territories Regional Chief Norman Yakeleya and FSIN Vice-Chief Morley Watson.

The National Chief outlined a number of ways the First Ministers could improve opportunities for First Nations. These included finding more ways to share in revenue and ownership; recruiting and retaining First Nations as part of advisory councils, corporate boards, and any decision-making bodies; consideration of legislation that would require a percentage of procurement be set aside for First Nation businesses and service providers; and improving access to equity.

National Chief Bellegarde stated that working with First Nations is the best way to respect First Nations rights and creates mutual benefits. He also made the point that Canada has an aging workforce and a skilled labour shortage, so it makes economic sense to invest in education and skills training for the fastest growing segment of Canada’s population – young First Nations men and women. The National Indigenous Economic Development Board estimates that Canada is missing out on $27.7 billion annually due to the under-utilization of the Indigenous workforce. 

 

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

 

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For media requests or more information, please contact:

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 382
613-292-0857 mobile
[email protected]

Jenna Young Castro
AFN Senior Communications Advisor
613-241-6789 ext. 201
613-314-8157 mobile
[email protected]

read more
Roy WhiteduckAFN National Chief Delivers Strong Message to First Ministers About First Nations Rights in Economic Decision Making
Assembly of First Nations
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