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AFN TECHNICAL BULLETIN – Chronic Wasting Disease

on June 17, 2018

CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE UPDATE

The Assembly of First Nations (AFN) is providing this Bulletin to all First Nations to share some important information on an environmental health issue that is affecting, deer, elk, moose, caribou, and potentially humans. Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) is a fatal neurological disease that affects species in the deer family (cervids). Neurological disorders are diseases of the brain, spine and the nerves that connect them.  In an effort to create awareness for First Nations, AFN will be developing communication materials to educate First Nations communities about CWD. Some quick facts on CWD are included on the next page of this Bulletin.

New scientific evidence suggests that CWD transmission to humans may be possible. To date however, there have been no reported human cases of CWD and further studies are being done to better understand potential risks. As the risk to humans is not yet fully understood, it is recommended that all animals harvested in areas where infection is known to occur be tested prior to consumption, and that any tissue from an infected animal not be used or consumed by humans.

CWD has spread north from the United States into Canada. Cases are currently contained to the provinces of Saskatchewan and Alberta, where testing is mandatory in certain areas. Voluntary testing is available in Ontario, Quebec, Manitoba, British Columbia, and Yukon. Information about CWD testing in each region is available through provincial and territorial government websites.

Many First Nations communities rely on hunting for food, social, and ceremonial use. This puts First Nations at increased risk of exposure to CWD. The AFN is working towards developing better resources to inform First Nations and raise awareness about CWD to assist in avoiding any potential risk, and to ensure First Nations are included in ongoing efforts to address this issue.

The AFN is mandated to engage in this work through Resolution 70/2010, First Nation-controlled Awareness, Training & Surveillance Program for Chronic Wasting Disease and Resolution 13/2017, Chronic Wasting Disease. As set out in these resolutions, the AFN will continue to work with concerned First Nations, organizations, and governments to develop and strengthen First Nation wildlife and human health programs, including those dealing with Chronic Wasting Disease.

AFN will provide more information on CWD as it is available.  For more information on CWD please contact:

Benjamin Green-Stacey, [email protected]

Or

Judith Eigenbrod, [email protected]


 

Quick Facts on Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD):

  • Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal nervous system disease known to infect white-tailed deer, mule deer, black-tailed deer, moose,  elk, and caribou.
  • It is recommended that all harvested animals be submitted for testing before consumption, and that any tissue that may have come from a CWD-infected animal not be used or consumed by humans.
  • Animals with CWD may show a number of different symptoms as the disease slowly damages their brain. These include: excessive thirst, salivation and urination, lack of coordination, paralysis, separation from the other animals in the herd and, weight loss.
  • CWD was first detected in Canada on a Saskatchewan elk farm in 1996. Since then the disease has spread across Saskatchewan and Alberta.
  • CWD is transmitted directly through contact between infected animals and indirectly through contact with contaminated surfaces and soil in the environment. CWD is confirmed by testing tissue from the affected animal after it is dead.
  • No treatment is available for animals affected with CWD. No vaccine is available to prevent CWD infection in wildlife or humans.
  • Currently CWD is a reportable disease under the Health of Animals Act and all cases must be reported to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, resulting in immediate investigation.
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rdbrinkhurstAFN TECHNICAL BULLETIN – Chronic Wasting Disease

AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde Congratulates New AFN Yukon Regional Chief Kluane Adamek

on June 12, 2018

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde congratulates Kluane Adamek who was elected by acclamation as the AFN Yukon Regional Chief Thursday.

“I have spoken with Regional Chief Adamek to offer my congratulations on this strong show of support from First Nations in her region,” said AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde. “Regional Chief Adamek is a tireless advocate for the priorities of Yukon First Nations at the national level and her contributions inform all work on the AFN Executive Committee. I welcome her and look forward to her continued efforts and leadership in priority areas, including the environment, economic development, education, child and youth development and governance.”

Regional Chief Adamek has served as Interim Regional Chief for the Yukon since January 2018. As Interim Regional Chief, Adamek brought together Yukon First Nations leaders for three summits focused on setting accountability, structure and priorities for the AFN Yukon Region. Yukon First Nation leadership approved key documents at these meetings. Through an increased social media presence, a new website and regular information bulletins, the AFN Yukon Regional Office is strengthening vital communication and coordination across the region.

“I am deeply humbled to be named Regional Chief Elect. I am committed to working with our leaders, communities, Elders and youth to champion our causes and strengthen our voices at the national level,” said Regional Chief Adamek, who is honoured to continue supporting all Yukon First Nations over the next three years. “We came together to build on the work of our former leaders. I’m proud of all that we’ve accomplished during these last few months. We’ve strengthened the regional office and continue to support all Yukon First Nations at their direction. I am committed to advancing this work so together, we can make a difference, continue to press for fairness and equity, and ensure our priorities are reflected nationally.”

Regional Chief Adamek is a proud citizen of Kluane First Nation. She will be sworn in as AFN Yukon Regional Chief on June 28, 2018 at the first AFN Yukon First Nations Annual Summit being held on Na-Cho Nyak Dun Traditional Territory.

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

For media requests or more information, please contact:

Jamie Monastyrski
Press Secretary – National Chief’s Office
613-241-6789 ext 116
343-540-6179 (cell)
[email protected]

Jenna Young Castro
AFN Communications Officer
613-241-6789 ext 201
613-314-8157 (cell)
[email protected]

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 382
613-292-0857
[email protected]

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Roy WhiteduckAFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde Congratulates New AFN Yukon Regional Chief Kluane Adamek

AFN Renews Call for Families First Approach as National Inquiry Receives Extended Mandate

on June 7, 2018

June 5, 2018

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde and Chief Denise Stonefish, Chair of the AFN Women’s Council, said today the extension of the National Inquiry on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls creates an opportunity to refocus its work in ways that will ensure survivors and families are at the forefront.

“The National Inquiry must allow survivors of violence and families of victims to inform its work through their experiences and sharing of their recommendations,” said AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde.  “As I’ve said from day one of this Inquiry, we must not wait for the outcome of the Inquiry to provide safety and security to all families at risk.  The announcements today of resources for health and investigative supports are important and welcomed as part of ongoing, sustained efforts to end violence against Indigenous women and girls.”

Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Carolyn Bennett today announced the federal government will extend the National Inquiry on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls until April 30, 2019, providing an additional two months to June 30, 2019 to end operations.  The final report and recommendations are now expected April 30, 2019.  The government also announced new funds and resources for health supports, law enforcement and commemorative activities.

The AFN has a national resolution supporting an extension provided the National Inquiry takes a families first approach.

“The National Inquiry needs to organize its work in these final months in a way that effectively engages survivors and families,” said Chief Denise Stonefish, Chair of the Assembly of First Nations Women’s Council.  “’Families first’ means survivors and families are actively engaged every step of the way, that outreach to them is improved and their input is respected.  The federal government must ensure families and survivors are involved in the implementation of health supports and services.  And these health supports and services must be ongoing until the recommendations of the final report are implemented. This is the only way to achieve results that will ensure safety and security for Indigenous women and girls.”

Minister Bennett today also announced the Government of Canada’s response to recommendations by the National Inquiry released in an interim report in November 2017.  This includes $21.3 million for health support services to survivors of violence and for the families of victims.  Health supports will extend to June 20, 2020.

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada.  Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

 

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For more information, please contact:

Jamie Monastyrski
Press Secretary – National Chief’s Office
Assembly of First Nations
343-540-6179 (cell)
[email protected]

Jenna Young Castro
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 201
613-314-8157 (cell)
[email protected]

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 382
613-292-0857
[email protected]

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Roy WhiteduckAFN Renews Call for Families First Approach as National Inquiry Receives Extended Mandate

On Third Anniversary of Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action, Assembly of First Nations Urges Governments and All Canadians to Commit to Progress and Results

on June 1, 2018

June 1, 2018 

(Ottawa, ON) – In advance of the third anniversary of the release of 94 Calls to Action by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde today called for action and results from governments and Canadians.

“We all have a role in reconciliation – governments, institutions, First Nations and every Canadian,” said AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde.  “We need to see urgent and sustained action by all levels of government to work with First Nations to give life to the TRC’s Calls to Acton. Canadians need to know that their actions, big and small, will help drive change.  Learn more about our shared history and read the Calls to Action. Then find a way to contribute to reconciliation and help close the gap in the quality of life between First Nations and Canada.”

On June 2, 2015 the TRC released 94 Calls to Action on priorities aimed at reconciliation, including child welfare, justice, education and health. The full report was released December 15, 2015. The findings followed six years of testimony from more than 7,000 former residential school students across Canada, and experts and others connected to the residential schools.

To help commemorate the third anniversary of the TRC Calls to Action, and to raise awareness of National Indigenous History month, the AFN is encouraging Canadians to educate themselves and to take concrete action in support of reconciliation.  Acts of reconciliation can include writing Senators to support Bill C-262 (a bill to enact the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples).  The first principle in the TRC’s Calls to Action states that the UN Declaration is “the framework for reconciliation at all levels and across all sectors of Canadian society”.

Canadians can take other actions to help advance understanding, awareness and reconciliation, such as participating in the KAIROS Blanket Exercise (available online and iTunes via the AFN Education Toolkit), visiting an Indigenous Friendship Centre, taking part in ceremonies or listening to Elders and Wisdom Keepers, attending National Indigenous Peoples Day events (marked on June 21, with events continuing through the weekend in many places) and reading books, essays and publications or viewing films or series about the shared history of Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in Canada.

The AFN is currently working with Indigenous Watchdog to analyze the federal government’s progress on implementing the 94 Calls to Action, and continues to encourage direct engagement with First Nations to fulfil this work.  The advocacy and policy work of the AFN is closely aligned with the Calls to Action, including efforts and progress in the areas of First Nations education, languages, child welfare and health.

 

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada.  Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

 

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For more information, please contact:

Jamie Monastyrski
Press Secretary – National Chief’s Office
613-241-6789 ext. 116
343-540-6179 mobile
[email protected]

Jenna Young Castro
Communications Officer
613-241-6789, ext 201
613-314-8157 mobile
[email protected]

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
613-241-6789 ext. 282
613-292-0857 mobile
[email protected]

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Roy WhiteduckOn Third Anniversary of Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action, Assembly of First Nations Urges Governments and All Canadians to Commit to Progress and Results

National Chief Welcomes Passing on Third Reading in Parliament of United Nations Declaration Bill

on May 30, 2018

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde welcomed the passing on third reading of Private Member’s Bill C-262, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act, in the House of Commons today. The bill will now go to the Senate, taking another significant step closer to becoming Canadian law.

“The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is the framework for reconciliation and closing the gap in the quality of life between First Nations and Canada,” said AFN National Chief Bellegarde. “It affirms the Treaty and inherent rights and title of First Nations. It is now ten years since the Declaration was adopted by the UN General Assembly and time for Canada to make this important commitment to move on its implementation in full partnership with First Nations. I commend all those who voted today in support of this bill. In particular, I lift up NDP MP Romeo Saganash for working so hard with his colleagues, with First Nations and Canadians across the country to advance this Bill.

I urge Members of the Senate to deal expeditiously with this Bill and look forward to the historic day, now closer than ever, when it is given Royal Assent. That will move all of us forward and create a more fair and just country.”

 

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada.  Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

For more information, please contact:

Jamie Monastyrski
Press Secretary – National Chief’s Office
613-241-6789 ext. 116
343-540-6179 mobile
[email protected]

Jenna Young Castro
Communications Officer
613-241-6789, ext. 201
613-314-8157 mobile
[email protected]

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
613-241-6789 ext. 282
613-292-0857 mobile
[email protected]

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Roy WhiteduckNational Chief Welcomes Passing on Third Reading in Parliament of United Nations Declaration Bill

Auditor General Report Shows Need for Government to Make Better Use of Data, Work with First Nations to Make Faster Progress on Closing the Gap

on May 30, 2018

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde today responded to the Auditor General of Canada’s report, calling on Canada to change its approach and make better use of data it is collecting to make more informed decisions to close the gap in the quality of life between First Nations people and Canada more quickly.

“Canada is requiring data and then not using it effectively to improve the lives of First Nations people,” said AFN National Chief Bellegarde. “The Auditor General’s report shows clearly the need for the federal government to engage directly with First Nations to share more information and get better decisions and better results. This has been a long-standing issue and one First Nations and the Auditor General have raised repeatedly over the years. We fully support the recommendations that the government engage directly with First Nations so we achieve better results for First Nations, and a stronger Canada.”

The report released today by the Office of the Auditor General of Canada included two chapters specific to First Nation and Indigenous peoples. Socio-economic Gaps on First Nations Reserves examines Indigenous Services Canada (ISC) with a focus on First Nations high school graduation rates on-reserve. The chapter states that ISC did not satisfactorily measure or report on Canada’s progress in closing the socio-economic gaps between on-reserve First Nations and other Canadians and that the Department’s use of data to improve education programs was inadequate. The report indicates that the education gap is actually growing, and that on-reserve high school graduation rates may be closer to 1 in 4 than the government’s reporting of 1 in 2.

The report includes an audit focused on programming by Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) aimed at increasing Indigenous employment. The report concludes that ESDC’s management of the programs was not sufficient to demonstrate that these programs achieved their goals. Collecting adequate data and defining performance indicators would allow ESDC to determine whether the programs are leading to meaningful and sustainable employment and whether changes are needed.

“It is essential that all investments and resources directed towards First Nations are reaching the people in need and having a positive impact,” said AFN National Chief Bellegarde. “It is simply unacceptable that the situation described by the Auditor General has been allowed to continue. We need to fix this broken approach, now. First Nations know what’s needed, what’s working and what isn’t, better than anyone because they are working directly with our people. This report reinforces our goals of First Nations control of First Nations education and the need for a distinct First Nations labour market strategy directed by First Nations.”

The report of the Auditor General sets out a number of recommendations for change that include engaging with First Nations and Indigenous peoples on decision-making and getting better, more accurate information. The National Chief noted this could include working towards a First Nations statistical institute.

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates

For more information, please contact:

Jamie Monastyrski
Press Secretary – National Chief’s Office
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 222
343-540-6179 (cell)
[email protected]

Jenna Young Castro
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext 201
613-314-8157 (cell)
[email protected]

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
613-241-6789 ext. 282
613-292-0857 mobile
[email protected]

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Sid LeeAuditor General Report Shows Need for Government to Make Better Use of Data, Work with First Nations to Make Faster Progress on Closing the Gap

Assembly of First Nations National Chief Statement on Canada’s Purchase of Trans Mountain Pipeline

on May 29, 2018

(Ottawa, ON) –Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde released the below statement following today’s announcement by the Government of Canada to purchase the Trans Mountain pipeline.

National Chief Perry Bellegarde: “Canada committed to honouring the UN Declaration and the right to free, prior and informed consent. First Nations have different positions on this project but they all agree and insist that their rights be respected, upheld and honoured by the Crown, and that includes the right to free, prior and informed consent. The onus is on the Crown to honour this duty, and that has not yet happened. One step is to bring First Nations together to have this essential dialogue.

First Nations have for centuries used our own protocols and traditional ways to solve problems and broker solutions where we are on different sides of an issue. Canada must work with First Nations and respect our rights regarding our lands and our lives.”

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

For more information, please contact:

Jamie Monastyrski
Press Secretary – National Chief’s Office
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 222
343-540-6179 (cell)
[email protected]

Jenna Young Castro
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext 201
613-314-8157 (cell)
[email protected]

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
613-241-6789 ext. 282
613-292-0857 mobile
[email protected]

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Sid LeeAssembly of First Nations National Chief Statement on Canada’s Purchase of Trans Mountain Pipeline

AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde Wants Governments to Work with First Nations in Manitoba to Ensure Safety During the Wildfire Emergency

on May 23, 2018

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde said today that all governments and emergency service providers must work with First Nations leadership in Manitoba to ensure the safety and security of all those affected by the wildfire situation in the province.

“Our first thoughts are for the safety and well-being of all the families, the children, men and women in the communities that are dealing with this crisis situation,” said AFN National Chief Bellegarde. “This calls for immediate action by the federal and provincial governments and all emergency service providers to work cooperatively and collaboratively in coordination with the First Nations to find the most effective and efficient way to get our people out of harm’s way. This is not an issue of jurisdiction. This is an issue of the safety and security for First Nations families.”

The current situation is volatile and changing rapidly. The most recent reports indicate wildland fires have resulted in the need to fully evacuate Little Grand Rapids, Pauingassi First Nation and Sapotaweyak Cree Nation in Manitoba.

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

For media requests or more information, please contact:

Jamie Monastyrski
Press Secretary
National Chief’s Office
343-540-6179 (cell)
[email protected]

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
613-241-6789 ext. 382
613-290-0706 (cell)
[email protected]

 

 

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Angie TurnerAFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde Wants Governments to Work with First Nations in Manitoba to Ensure Safety During the Wildfire Emergency

National Chief Perry Bellegarde Hails New Approach to First Nations Funding as a Significant Step Towards Stronger First Nations

on May 23, 2018

May 22, 2018

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde says the move now underway towards ten-year funding grants for First Nations is an important step in building a new, more effective and efficient fiscal relationship between First Nations and Canada and is a significant result of the Canada-First Nations New Fiscal Relationship.

“This new approach is an essential and significant step towards a new fiscal relationship between First Nations and Canada, aimed at sufficient, predictable, sustained funding,” said AFN National Chief Bellegarde. “The current year-to-year funding approach is unpredictable and burdensome. The move to ten-year grants means our governments can take a strategic approach to long-term planning and maximize the effectiveness of all resources. This builds stronger First Nations governments and will make a real difference on the ground for our families.”

The ten-year grants were included in recommendations in a report endorsed by Chiefs-in-Assembly at the AFN Special Chiefs Assembly in December 2017. A ten-year grant is intended to increase the flexibility and the predictability for First Nations governments to manage funds and reduce the administrative burden under the current annual “contributions agreements” approach. Eligibility requirements for a ten-year grant are based on a co-developed approach to assessing financial performance and administration, including a Financial Administration Law.

Chief David Jimmie of Squiala First Nation, who co-chairs the AFN Chiefs Committee on Fiscal Relations with the National Chief, stated: “The new approach means First Nations will be able to leverage long-term, sustainable, predictable funding to invest in their priorities. It provides an opportunity for greater planning along with the leverage needed when looking for financing partners. It also puts accountability for First Nations governments with their citizens first, where it should be. This single step benefits all of us because when First Nations succeed, we all succeed.”

Information is now being provided to First Nations about the new approach and how to access it. It is anticipated that at least 100 First Nations will be eligible for ten-year grants within the first year, with more to follow. The 2017 report by the Canada-First Nations New Fiscal Relations Working Group A New Approach: Co-development of a New Fiscal Relationship Between Canada and First Nations is available at: http://www.afn.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/A-New-Approach-Co%E2%80%90development-of-a-New-Fiscal-Relationship.pdf

 

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada.  Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

 

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For more information, please contact:

Jamie Monastyrski
Press Secretary – National Chief’s Office
613-241-6789 ext. 116
343-540-6179 mobile
[email protected]

Jenna Young Castro
Communications Officer
613-241-6789, ext 201
613-314-8157 mobile
[email protected]

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
613-241-6789 ext. 282
613-292-0857 mobile
[email protected]

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Roy WhiteduckNational Chief Perry Bellegarde Hails New Approach to First Nations Funding as a Significant Step Towards Stronger First Nations

Assembly of First Nations Marks First National Day of First Nations Fishing Rights

on May 21, 2018

May 21, 2018

(Ottawa, ON) – First Nations leaders from across Canada marked May 21 this year as the first ever National Day of First Nations Fishing Rights. The day was established through AFN resolution 75/2017, dedicating the first Monday preceding May 25, or “Victoria Day”, to be recognized to honour First Nations’ rights to fish.

“Fishing is part of First Nations cultures and identities,” said AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde. “It sustains our peoples and economies and is interconnected to healthy individuals and strong, sustainable nations. Fishing has been at the forefront of exercising and asserting First Nations inherent rights many times in recent history and the subject of a number of landmark court decisions. The intent of the National Day of First Nations Fishing Rights is to reaffirm and exercise First Nations’ inherent right to fish and manage our own resources, while at the same time raising awareness of our role and responsibilities in conservation and water protection.”

First Nations in Canada have inherent and Treaty rights protected in the Canadian Constitution and recognized in a number of Supreme Court decisions such as Sparrow (1990), Gladstone (1996), Delgamuukw (1997), Marshall (1999), Haida (2004) and Ahousaht (2009).  These rights include the right to traditional and customary governance of traditional lands, waters and resources, including fisheries.  First Nations rights are further articulated in international law, including the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

A number of First Nations are exercising the right to institute their own laws in regard to fishing, including Sheshegwaning First Nations first aquaculture law, Listguj Miqmaq first-ever salmon law and Nisga Lisims fish and wildlife laws.

“Victoria Day reminds us of a period in our shared history when many Treaties were signed,” said AFN Regional Chief Roger Augustine who co-chairs the AFN National Fisheries Committee.  “The National Fisheries Committee chose this day in an effort to decolonize a day named for the Queen who presided over many of the Treaties made with First Nations and remind everyone in this land of First Nations rights.”

“National Fishing Rights Day is about asserting our rights, but also raising awareness among Canadians,” said AFN Regional Chief Terry Teegee who co-chairs the National Fisheries Committee.  “We declare this day in the spirit of reconciliation and education of our rights and practices.”

The AFN is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada.  Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

 

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For more information, please contact:

Jamie Monastyrski
Press Secretary – National Chief’s Office
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext. 222
343-540-6179 (cell)
[email protected]

Jenna Young Castro
Communications Officer
Assembly of First Nations
613-241-6789 ext 201
613-314-8157 (cell)
[email protected]

Monica Poirier
Bilingual Communications Officer
613-241-6789 ext. 282
613-292-0857 mobile
[email protected]

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Roy WhiteduckAssembly of First Nations Marks First National Day of First Nations Fishing Rights
Assembly of First Nations
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